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Author Topic: Aid question  (Read 137 times)

trad_doc

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Aid question
« on: October 18, 2004, 06:57:38 AM »

Having done no aid climbing whatsoever, I was wondering what would constitute a starter clean aid rack for the MWV area?  Is this mostly a matter of doubling or tripling up gear on a standard rack?
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scottie_c

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Re: Aid question
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2004, 07:41:55 AM »

lots of oval biners
a clip stick
stiff draw (duct taped)
some hooks
small rack of micros
2-3 sets of nuts
doubles of most cams up to #2 camalot
fifi hook
daisy chain(s)
etriers (some use 2 sets)
bolt hangers
10-15 slings
a couple cords
static haul line
2 jumars

pretty generic. some will use less cams than nuts. some will back clean (ususally less gear is needed). some will drink beer. anything (except mindless drilling and destruction of routes) is allowed.

have fun
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trad_doc

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Re: Aid question
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2004, 02:30:45 PM »

Thanks for the advice!  Is there a specific reason to use oval biners for aid?  I would think the light weight of wiregates would be a bonus if you're lugging and aid rack already, unless theres something about their shape that makes them no good for aiding on?
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scottie_c

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Re: Aid question
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2004, 03:59:18 PM »

oval biners keep the weight from suddenly shifting under weight, which can cause you to soil your britches OR a fall if on sketchy gear
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tradmanclimbz

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Re: Aid question
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2004, 09:48:56 AM »

Not being a serious aid climber but one who ocasionaly dabs into it i do not have a second set of oval biners. i use what i have and it does generaly work. I find that there are some kinds of sport biners that are a pain in the butt for aid so i leave those behind. the BD wiregates seem to work pretty well. Put an oval on your tres. ther biners on your tres will get pretty chewed up. i swear bt adjustable daisys but beware of the Metioulious ones. they break. there have been a few accidents from them. I like my home made one with 9mm cord and a ropeman. I generaly use one adjustable and one reg.
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Tim

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Re: Aid question
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2004, 03:39:04 PM »

Ya! Get adjustable daisys and steps in order to reduce bulk and tangles, you'll move faster.
On the subject of moving faster...
Check out the TECHTIP on Aid Climbing in the March 2003 Climbing Mag, (the Golden Piton Award issue).
There are too many "freedom of the Hills" aid climbers out there.  That old-school method of aiding is slow as shit!  If, in between each placement, you have to fumble around with a rack to find your next piece, it will take you ages to climb a 1000 foot route.  
This "new-school" Yosemite-style aid climbing will make you move as fast as a free climber.  
For those of you that don't have the issue, you have a set of  thin-fingers to thin-hands cams on the end of each daisy.  Along with a biner that's taped open (for clipping into fixed pieces that aren't worth clipping your rope into anyways, or bolt ladders where it may not be necessary to clip your rope through each one), A few micro nuts, and a few hooks needed on that particular climb.   Generally I try to only clip my rope into fixed gear (you don't need to clip every bolt on a bolt ladder made of new 3/8 inch bolts), run it out a bit, especially if it's a steep pitch, you'll move much faster.  I usually have a set of nuts, a few tri-cams and some bigger cams on the back of my harness incase I feel too run-out or hit a wide section.  Wear an old ratty pair of climbing shoes too, you'll have more power while highstepping or for when you get to a cruiser 5.8-9 section in between hard moves, you can just step out of your aiders and start free-climbing.
The taped-open biner is nice when transitioning to free-climbing because you can just flick your aider free of your last piece and start crankin'.
Oh-ya! and one more thing!  Highstep damn-it!  I know it's tough and you'll probably feel it in the abs the next morning, but you'll move quicker.
Using these tactics on popular aid climbs here in the MWV will turn a normally grueling full-day experience into an enjoyable morning endevor.  
Learn how to short-fix too!  if you get good at these skills, there is a good chance you'll be able to do a grade V or VI without a haul-bag.  Then you wont' ever need to experience the pleasures of hauling!
Don't waste your money on old-school ovals either.  If you're worried about biner-shift making a piece blow, you're on A3 or harder.  If that becomes the case, keep a couple of wire gate ovals on the back of your harness for the sketchy placements.  Aid climbing is so biner intensive (thus heavy), that you shouldn't have a "regular" gated carabiner on your harness unless it has a lock on it.  All others should be wire-gates.
Rip it Up!
Tim  
« Last Edit: October 22, 2004, 03:45:00 PM by Tim »
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