Author Topic: indoor dry tooling  (Read 253 times)

Offline monkeyguyy

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indoor dry tooling
« on: November 12, 2004, 10:00:23 pm »
Anyone have any suggestions on how to make an indoor climbing wall dry tool friendly?  I don't want to use the plastic holds and chip or scratch them.(and they don't offer very solid placements)  I'm looking for something that will be very solid, no popping tools, just something to train strength and movement on.  I figure I can cut holds from 2x4's or something but wasn't sure just how to go about doing it.  Thanks for any suggestions, Adam

Offline chops

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Re: indoor dry tooling
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2004, 08:41:16 am »
I too started off with chunks of 2x4's but they got beat up too quickly.  Instead I made a bunch of squares out of 2x4's then cut up some 3/4" plywood into squares 1" on a side larger than the 2x4 blocks.  I centered the 2x4 blocks in the middle of the plywood then screwed and glued them together.  To attach them to the wall I drilled a hole in the center and got myself some nice fattie washers to place under the bolt head.

Once one side gets beat just rotate 90°.  With these little guys you can also stein pull off the sides and bottom.


Offline DWarriner

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Re: indoor dry tooling
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2004, 12:08:03 pm »
I did the 2x4 thing and it worked okay, but as chops pointed out, they did get banged up very quickly and left splinters all over the place.  If you want to be able to swing a tool and get some sort of decent feel for placement though, I think this is one of the better was to go.  I would rig the system so that you replace the 2x4s freqently.  e.g. I would bolt them right into T-nuts.

If you're just going for strength, I am now using a system where I took short pieces of 3/4" webbing and treaded them through bolt hangers.  I just hook them.  Then I'll take  a bunch of draws and clip some of the hangers while I'm going up and down.  This simulates some aspects of leading (manipulating biners and such).  I have a garage with very overhanging walls which makes this a pretty good workout.

This doesn't help you with your swing at all, but definately help with your endurance.

One other thing.  If you use wood, don't use plywood, use 2x4s and try to mount them with the grain going up and down (not horizontal).  The wood will last a little longer and not splinter so much.

-David
There are no stupid questions - only stupid answers.