Author Topic: Improving Inverno boot fit  (Read 252 times)

Offline DogDriver

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Improving Inverno boot fit
« on: February 02, 2003, 12:51:46 PM »
Hi,

I have a pair of Scarpa Inverno boots. I bought them for general mountaineering rather than techical ice.

I bought a size 10.5 (for reference I use mondo 28.0 in ski boots) since I felt the 10.0 was too tight.

I have been snowshoeing several times in Catskills over the last month. I find that going downhill my foot slides forward and bangs my toes against the front. Did I buy the boots to large?

How would you shell fit a pair of plastic boots? Similar to skiboots?

What are my options for better stabilizing the foot? At present I am using Superfeet insoles and I am considering using the old insoles as volume adjusters. Any other good ideas?

Thanks,

Morten

David Metzger

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Re: Improving Inverno boot fit
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2003, 01:20:10 PM »
The liner boots that come with the Invernos are a total dogs . I got a crazy idea one day and used my Salomon snowboard boot liners (which are amazingly well made) instead. I have since thrown away the Scarpa liners (and the Salomon outers) and use one combined boot for both climbing and boarding.

So even if you don't snowboard, I'd recommend trying to get the liners.  And they're considerably warmer too.

As for fit, if you'll be doing walking, especially uphill, keep the upper laces loose. Your shins will thank you.

Offline DogDriver

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Re: Improving Inverno boot fit
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2003, 05:30:10 PM »
David,

I normally don't lace the upper hook, only the lower. That seems to save me from shinbang. Should I lace the upper also when going downhill?

Going downhill in snowshoes seems to me to be much gentler than frontpointing vertical ice. So how do you ice climbers (that use Invernos, especially) avoid banging your toes for every step.

Thanks,

Morten

David Metzger

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Re: Improving Inverno boot fit
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2003, 06:29:08 AM »
The test of a proper fitting ice climbing boot is to find something in the store, a staircase for instance, and kick the crap out of it. If you don't feel it in your toes, that's at least one positive checkmark. The invernos are like a cast on your foot, and generally have poor ankle flexibility, and weigh a ton. I've snowshoed approaches to ice climbs with them, and it feels like the proverbial concrete shoes. Not recommended.

But since you own them already, and they are clearly not fitting very well, I'd still try to find a higher volume inner boot.


Good luck.

Offline schwortz

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Re: Improving Inverno boot fit
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2003, 09:15:05 AM »
you can always get custom liners
there's a shop in boston where you can get them fit. they send the boots to a custom guy in vermont (sole systems) and then you get the boots back.

here's the reply i got to an email:

"Yes, Climbers come to us from all parts of the country for our custom plastic boot work.
Please call 617-277-5858 for any questions and a free appointment with  our mountaineering boot expert Dave Prahl."

Offline kurtster

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Re: Improving Inverno boot fit
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2003, 06:21:32 PM »
i have a weird wide foot and dave has done footbeds and custom boot work for me with very good results .well worth the $$$ spent.(no more pain a good thing)

adkman

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Re: Improving Inverno boot fit
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2003, 09:36:07 AM »
Try the Intuition Denali or Raichle Thermoflex liners.  You can get them online and mold them yourself, but I would definitely do it at a knowledgeable dealer (www.mountaineer.com).  The process can take an hour or more and a good fitter will make all the difference in the world.

Pros:
- Custom fit.
- Super light.
- As warm as high altitude liners.
- Closed cell foam never gets soaked through.

Cons:
- Closed cell foam can be clammy and your socks get wetter, but you can always change your socks.
- Dramatically stiffer than stock liners.  Takes some getting used to.
- Don't work well in Alphas because of the toe box.