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Author Topic: Post 2 - Update on Giant/Dix UMP's & Fixed Anchors  (Read 89 times)

arockclimber

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Post 2 - Update on Giant/Dix UMP's & Fixed Anchors
« on: March 03, 2003, 07:36:13 PM »

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FOR CLARITIES SAKE, ANY TEXT IN THIS DOCUMENT ENCLOSED IN SOLID LINES CAME DIRECTLY FROM THE UMP'S FOR THE DIX/GIANT WILDERNESS AREAS, OR THE APSLMP (ADIRONDACK PARK STATE LAND MASTER PLAN), OR OTHER STATE DOCUMENTS WHICH HAVE LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS UPDATE.
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     -A Ban on fixed anchors (bolts, pins, webbing, rap anchors) in Giant/Dix area (This would encompass Chapel Pond, Beer Walls, King Phillips Spring, Washbowl, Spider's Web, King Wall, Creature Wall, and others.):
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The Adirondack region remains one of few areas in the country where the placement of fixed climbing anchors (bolts) is not common -place. The reputation of the region is one of traditional climbing, one where bolts and pitons are the exception rather than the rule. Bolts, permanent pitons and other fixed anchors are prohibited as non-conforming uses (see listed conforming uses on pages 21-22,APSLMP, 2001) under the APSLMP and implied in Department regulation 6 NYCRR 190.8(g)("No person shall deface, remove, destroy, or otherwise injure in any manner whatsoever any ...rock, fossil or mineral ...").
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-And under the heading Management Objectives:
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o Erection of bolts, pitons or other fixed anchors by the public is illegal and non-conforming and will be monitored.
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-Section 2 - Inventory, Use and Capacity to Withstand Use.
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Rock climbing activities are quite popular in the unit.  Mellor (1995) identifies nine distinct climbing areas on the west side of Route 73 in the vicinity of Chapel Pond.  Principle attractions include the cliffs adjacent to Chapel Pond, the so-called "Beer Walls " ((Chapel Pond Pass) and the "King Philip Wall," adjacent to the spring of the same name.  The "Beer Walls " are the most highly -used climbing area in the Adirondack Forest Preserve due, in part, to the ease of access from the highway, the diversity of difficulty and the abundance of clean climbing routes. "The Empress " rising from the Chapel Pond slab is arguably the most popular friction climbing route in the Adirondack Park.  The King Philip area provides several easy instructional routes that are popular with youth camps in the area.
Instructional routes - those that are "top-roped "3 and with a low level of difficulty - are extremely rare in this area. In the Route 73 corridor between Northway Exit 30 and the Village of Lake Placid there are only a half-dozen routes that offer the characteristics which make them ideal instructional areas. These areas see an incredible amount of use and associated impact in the form of severe devegetation, tree mortality, and erosion at the base of the routes where the groups congregate and at the top of the routes where trees are used as belay anchors.  Often one or two large groups monopolize most of the climbing area, displacing other climbers. Large groups are often poorly managed, creating unsafe conditions for both climbers and observers. Larger groups cause substantially greater environmental impacts than the equivalent number of climbers in smaller sized groups.
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