Author Topic: Mountaineering?  (Read 2580 times)

bdb

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Mountaineering?
« on: December 23, 2008, 12:36:09 PM »
Are there any good basic mountaineering style climbs in the area (no technical ice climbing)?

I climbed Shasta and hood last summer and really enjoy those kinds of climbs and don't have the equipment/knowledge to do any "ice climbing." I'm a bit confused as to the proper terminology used around the forum. I've got ten point crampons, a 70mm ice axe, and some rope (and all of the necessities to go along with glacier travel, which obviously doesn't come into play out here) and want to do some sort of climb where I can feel like I'm going for a CLIMB rather than a HIKE if you catch my drift.

Just looking for a few ideas/mountains/routes.

bmbuffy

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2008, 09:18:44 PM »
try the huntington ravine tr. to summit washington. just watch out for avalanche danger.

RhodeIslandJeff

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2009, 12:19:05 PM »
What would you say about doing the The Great Gully trail or the King Ravine trail up the King Ravine on Mt. Adams provided avalanche danger is low. The selling point being the destination of day one is the Craig Hut. Provided time and energy is there summit Mt. Jefferson on day 2 and descend the Caps Ridge Trail rapping the tough spots or down climbing when its feasible. Or summit Adams/Madison or just descend from the Craig Hut. Bringing a rope I'm guessing would be a necessity. It would also be a full pack adventure.

Accident Report on the Great Gully Trail

http://www.avalanche-center.org/Incidents/1997-98/19971123-NewHampshire.php

Only online winter pic I could find of the Great Gully Trail.

http://images.quickblogcast.com/40829-37494/Monkman_KingRavine_0021.jpg

The link below has some excellent photos of the King Ravine in the summer. Not mine although I did do the KR trail last summer with a friend. Looks like it would be even better in the winter and the Great Gully trail looks a little steeper than the KR trail. We stayed at the Craig Hut even though we had planned on Bivvying. Nice hut with an amazing view that is open in the winter.

http://hikermatt.com/Documents/AdamsKingRavine.html


As you can probably tell this ones high on my list of to do's.
The avy course is still at the top of my list though.


Offline JBro

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2009, 01:13:52 PM »
I've been up Great Gully twice, I think both times in early Nov. From what I can remember there was a little bit of what I would call grade 2 ice, some really easy mixed, and a lot of low angle snow climbing. We used a rope both times -- at least down low where most of the ice is.



 
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Offline adamiata

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2009, 06:02:50 PM »
How do you afford your rock'n'roll lifestyle?

randy j goat

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2009, 09:19:05 AM »
only thing with doing routes over in that part of the range is there are no avy risk postings. Make sure you have a good feal and knowledge of recognizing avalanche potential if you go there, and GG is known to slide so use good judgment.

bristolpipe

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2009, 10:09:30 AM »

meclimber

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2009, 10:45:32 AM »
Great Link!

cbcbd

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2009, 03:02:43 PM »
Boot Spur gullies, Hillman's Highway, all of Tux headwall, South Gully in Huntington, Central in Huntington... to name a few.

randy j goat

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2009, 07:24:03 AM »
Bootspur is real nice.Actually any of those routes would be good and you can get the benefit of posted avy conditions for Tuckerman and Huntingtons ravines.

Offline llamero

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2009, 08:07:45 PM »
A group of us did a bit of mountaineering in Acadia National Park this past spring.  We went up the Ladder trail up to the summit of Dorr Mountain and then went across the gorge to the summit of Cadillac, and the hike was surprisingly fun.  The snow iced up really well, making the trek ice axe mandatory, and were were treated to beautiful views, amazing ice falls, and had both mountains completely to ourselves (there are very few mountaineers on the island).  If you ever get a chance, definitely try out Acadia National Park next winter...the mountains may be low but the conditions are pretty good.

The following is a link to a video I took of the climb: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3hYUqTrs5U
It is better to not summit and wish you had, than to summit and wish you hadn't.

Offline perswig

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2009, 07:39:23 AM »
I'm still grinning.
While Acadia has to be considered "mountaineering lite" at best, your video looks way fun.  Chopping steps, glissades, bluebird day, empty park.  Great idea, good clip, cool soundtrack.  Maybe next time bring crampons or Yaktrax or something?
Seeing how much ice was still hanging as we got up in the park this early spring, I'm thinking some winter trips might be in order.
Dale
If it's overhanging, I'm probably off-route.

Offline llamero

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Re: Mountaineering?
« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2009, 10:09:40 AM »
It's definitely mountaineering lite, especially after getting to play in the beautiful snow fields and cols of the Cascades.  However, for Maine it was good enough, and right in my backyard.  The trick is to make believe that when you're climbing the ladder trail, you're really climbing Liberty Col on Mount Rainier  :D.  I've also heard that Mount Sargent has some good mountaineering, however this was after the ice melted so I didn't get to try it out.  Certainly will have to get out there next winter.

As for the conditions that day, the week before my wife and I climbed Dorr the weekend before and it was soft snow on ice, but on this day the temps never got above freezing so everything was solid ice.  So, since none of us had crampons and kick stepping was impossible, everyone became very versed in why there's an adz on the ice axe.

Acadia is a fairly good place to practice mountaineering, where most of the run-outs end in trees or bushes rather than off of a cliff or into a boulder field (for one person in our group it was their first time hiking let alone mountaineering).  However, as my own little safety disclaimer, it is very easy to have a run-out be a cliff or to break a leg sliding into a tree (this happens a lot in the winter in the park), and it takes a bit of route finding to find trails from the summits of the mountains.  So, if anyone is unfamiliar with mountaineering (self-belay, self-arrest, etc.) or route finding above snow line, just hook up with someone who does and you'll have a safe fun trip  ;D.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2009, 10:30:25 AM by llamero »
It is better to not summit and wish you had, than to summit and wish you hadn't.