Author Topic: Damnation  (Read 1164 times)

Offline tradmanclimbz

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Re: Damnation
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2009, 11:54:23 am »
That is such a horrendous feeling when you are simo soloing up high and your partner falls.  In my case my partner survived but I had no way of knowing that at the time.  Nothing I could do but continue climbing up. I felt it was safer to go up than down so I went up and cut accross to south gully for the decent. Untill I actually got back over to where my partner had come to rest I had no hope that he was alive. It was such a horrendous fall there was no way he could have lived yet somehow he survived. 

Offline JBro

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Re: Damnation
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2009, 12:13:31 pm »
Yeah it's an aweful feeling but you shake it off because you have to. Mostly it hit me much harder later but Ned's family and friends were so supportive it helped a lot.

In my case, we were very near the top and I was trying to decide whether to go up or down, then I saw that a party we had talked to on the approach had bailed off North and they got to Ned within a minute or two. So I continued up and ran down Central as fast as I could.

I'm glad things worked out for you and your friend.
Have a quiche, now, or maybe a tort.  You deserve it!
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This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.
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Offline tradmanclimbz

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Re: Damnation
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2009, 12:44:41 pm »
Thanks, and I'm sorry that things didn't work out for you guys as well but the words don't change anything...  I had lost my best friend in a firey motocycle crash 8 months prior to the Mt washington  accident so the finality of death and all the baggage that comes with a young flame burning out before its time was very fresh in my mind. I knew the drill and knew it was going to really suck. I couldn't see where  my partner had ended up and I was maby 30ft from the top of the ice in Odels so I just had to settle down and do the climbing. I do recall makeing a promiss to myself that I would not give up climbing as I had given up motorcycle rideing.

Offline JBro

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Re: Damnation
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2009, 01:27:20 pm »
Trad that's weird man about your best friend. My best friend had died soloing "All Mixed Up" in RMNP about 2 years prior to Ned's accident. I also thought about quitting climbing but time heals everything I guess, or else maybe you snap.

I don't know if this is appropriate in this post, but I feel like sharing it and I think it will be ok with Al. (Al you can delete it if you don't think it should be here.)

I had plans to climb the West Rib of Denali that Spring, but after the accident didn't much feel like going on the trip. My partner convinced me to at least go and try the West Butt so that's what we did. Ned's mom gave me some of his ashes to bring and spread on the summit.

A few days after landing on the glacier, my partner got a pretty nasty stomach virus, and when he finally recovered I got it. Then we got hit with some bad weather and eventually decided to bail.

So right when the plane was coming in I remembered Ned's ashes. Me and my partner took a quick little walk away from basecamp. Just as I let Ned's ashes go a big wind kicked up, and micro-seconds later a huge avalanche came ripping off of Mount Hunter. I wanted to that as a sign from Ned but didn't really believe much in signs or whatever.

Anyway, I thought about Ned a lot on the flight back to Talkeetna. I stepped off the plane on this little airfield basically in the middle of nowhere and the first person I saw on the ground was Ned's close friend, Jamal. That kind of blew my mind.

I think that day was the start of letting everything go.

(I still struggle with whether to keep climbing though. It's damn hard to quit so I putter along doing easy stuff.)
Have a quiche, now, or maybe a tort.  You deserve it!
-bristolpipe

I like to keep things simple, even if it's faaaken painful and miserable.
-Stoney Middleton

This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.
-Friar Tuck

Offline Admin Al

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Re: Damnation
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2009, 01:52:51 pm »
I don't know if this is appropriate in this post, but I feel like sharing it and I think it will be ok with Al. (Al you can delete it if you don't think it should be here.)

I think it's perfectly appropriate. thanks for sharing your feelings.

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Offline tradmanclimbz

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Re: Damnation
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2009, 02:34:39 pm »
Our motorcycle riding was just foolish youth street racing... No serious organized competition or road touring or anything of substance. I parked my bike down at the end of the driveway and let it rust......

The climbing was a bit diferent. I gradually drifted away from climbing after that accident. just couldn't get the image of him falling out of my head and after about 2 years I just fizzeled out.   After about a 7 year break I started climbing again with more intensity than before and its held pretty strong for the last 15yrs..

Offline The other tomcat

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Re: Damnation
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2009, 06:03:24 pm »
...and I'd bet he's glad you did Nick.
Tom Stryker