Author Topic: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works  (Read 3592 times)

Offline alclimbup2

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2010, 07:47:07 PM »
also deers leap (not your vt. cliff tradman) in pelham or windham NH, has a few restrictions but a few nice climbs, some right on the water

Offline Jack_Dorsey

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2010, 09:23:06 PM »
This fall I went into the climbing area called "Durrell Mountain". To get there you take Durrell Mountain Road off of route 107 south of Laconia. As you drive in an easterly direction to the parking spot Durrell Mountain is on your right but not the climbing. The climbing area is on your left. It is on the south side of Whiteface Mountain.

If you follow the hiking trail that goes up Whiteface, the climbing areas will be on your right. This fall the entrances to the climbing areas were obvious. Equally obvious were the no trespassing signs at the start of the hiking trail. I bushwhacked around the marked area to meet the trail part way up the mountain. I've included a portion of the topo that I used to find my way in.

It would be good to get more information about the access issues and routes at this area. It was impressive.

Jack

Rocket J.

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Goffstown cliffs
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2010, 02:06:15 PM »
Are the Goffstown cliffs in area #3 on this map?
http://www.snhpc.org/pdf/Goffstown%202004%20LRPP.pdf

I wonder because I grew up within easy walking distance of this steep area of rock.
There was a boulder up there with a frog painted on it by the Hippies (yes, this was the 70's) and it was called Tipping Rock.  (I think there is another Tipping Rock across town on one of the Uncanoonac moutains...). 

We had some very nice glacial boulders in the woods of our back yard. 
Lots of fun, we had a cave formation suitable for stemming.
Of course, I did not know climbing was actually a SPORT  ::)








Offline alclimbup2

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Re: Goffstown Cliffs
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2010, 05:52:36 PM »
Rocket J. : it took a while with wife's help looking at that map but no, section 3 not the small sport crag in goffstown/dunbarton, would be more to the right of section 16, the crag is in woods after open power line area that runs along tibbetts hill road
 
is that tipping rock 20 feet or higher?, might have to go see that, I live in Dunbarton, my wife grew up in Goffstown 
 

Rocket J.

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Re: Goffstown Cliffs
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2010, 09:13:20 AM »

is that tipping rock 20 feet or higher?, might have to go see that, I live in Dunbarton, my wife grew up in Goffstown 
 

No, it is not, it is bigger than a small child but small enough so that a group of kids could with some effort send it down the ledge, although we did not!  I believe it used to belong to the Hambleton family, but then LaMontagne bought a chunk of property at the top of Summer St. where the bend is.  The access to the rock is now the driveway/private road (?) that extends to the LEFT at the top of Summer St.  I'm asuming that the pair of vicious dogs are long gone! Then the path winds to the right, there used to be a wide expanse of bull pasture there (with a bull, different story!!!) on the far end of that is the ledge with the rock.  It's likely the paint is faded, but who knows, someone might have kept up with it. 

The boulders in my former back yard which is between Summer St. and High St., however, are appx 20 feet tall, the size of small houses/cottages and good rock, the size of some of the boulders at Pawtuckaway, seems like the same type of rock too.

What decade does your wife claim?  I wonder if we knew each other.  I had many friends in Dunbarton growing up as well as some who lived over in the area behind the high school up on Wallace Road in the mountain area.

Besides the bouldering, there is decent cycling there too, I would cover 50 miles a day at least between New Boston, Parker Station, Weare, Grassmere, Dunbarton...I had a lot of energy to burn. 

Offline Admin Al

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Re: Goffstown Cliffs
« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2010, 10:25:29 AM »
I had a lot of energy to burn. 

love it... that was exactly the way I was as a kid. I used to ride my single speed Huffy from Jacksonville down to Jax Beach on the weekends. it must be 30 miles round trip. definitely burned off the energy for me. kids spend too much time in front of the TV these days.
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Offline strandman

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2010, 11:06:20 AM »
 ;D Al, now it would be a 27 speed Puffy !

Rocket J.

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Re: Goffstown Cliffs
« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2010, 11:20:07 AM »
that was exactly the way I was as a kid

Sadly, I am still that way.  Being a grownup has its downside.
I have to go to the gym every day right after the school bus leaves with the kids, so I can sit still to work.
Otherwise I am too antsy. Where is the pedal-powered computer when you need it?

Offline Admin Al

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2010, 02:10:09 PM »
I totally understand... anyone who knows me knows how much energy I have, some of which is even occasionally focused. if I don't XC ski or ride the bike every day I really cannot sit still for long.  :P
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Offline oldmansmith

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2010, 07:54:00 PM »
What about the place over in Swanzey NH I climbed there a few times years ago.Not sure what I was climbing but there were a few good cracks.
 Jim

Yes, Hewes hill it is.  A good Trad area up to 80' tall. I have a copy of an old guide if you need info Todd, e-mail me at wardandpaula@yahoo.com

 

Offline frik

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2010, 01:01:33 PM »
Hey Todd,

The "columns" in Greenville sounds like the area set up on an old RR bridge abutment and not an actual cliff... but i've been wrong before.

From what people are saying  about "the Goffstown crag" it confirms what i thought it was. These are not exact
directions, but close enough. From Manchester head west to Goffstown  on the "Goffstown Back road". Take a right onto Tibbuts hill road and follow that  until you hit black brook road. Now turn around and head back down tibbuts hill
taking the first right which should be a cul de sak. Park there and head south along the power lines. after a few hundred yards head right into the woods along a slight rise. The cliff is not hard to find and is below the trail, facing south and west.

Offline JBrochu

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2010, 01:20:43 PM »
I believe most of the climbs on those RR trestle's in Greenville were set up by the guy that used to own the rock gym out in that general area. I believe the gym was called Yag's Crag or something like that. If someone know's who I'm talking about and can contact that guy I think he would know the history.

I lived in Greenville for 1.5 years back around 95/96 and the climbs were already there - although I think they were fairly new. The police were already stopping people from climbing on them.
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Offline steve weitzler

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2010, 01:25:37 PM »
There was a photocopied guide to Greenville that I believe might have been done by the fellow that owned Yags, I think his name might have been Dave Quinn. I have a copy of it lying around somewhere. I remember going there once or twice in the middle to late eighties. I will see if I can find it. If anyone wants one I can copy it and get it to you.

Offline pjs

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #28 on: February 08, 2010, 10:32:18 AM »
It was Dave Quinn who put up the most of the routes on the greenville trestles. There are about a dozen routes in the 5.8 to 5.12 range, great climbs but the local authorities do patrol the area and escort you of the property. If we are going to throw manmade objects in the mix the stone arch bridge in Keene has a long climbing history and is climbing friendly, again it sports about a dozen routes and has a spectacular aid route up the middle of the grand arch over the Branch river put up back in the day by the FPC outing club. As far as info on the cheese cut all the new sport routes have been put up by Geoge and Bob from Gilsum.
Cheers

Offline strandman

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Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
« Reply #29 on: April 04, 2010, 10:43:54 AM »
Hey Todd- I would check with Al Rubin for Monadnock, he is on ST. Swanzey was the Saball's ? with base ? I'll send some info on marlowe though i can't find the duval guide.