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Author Topic: Training  (Read 760 times)

meclimber

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Training
« on: March 23, 2010, 03:42:03 PM »

So who does it, who hates it and what do you do?

I only get outside 1-2 days a week, typically one day climbing and the other bouldering for a few hours depending on the season.  When I'm motivated (like now, Yosemite only a few months off) I Drink on Monday,try weight training Tuesday (mountain athelete is a great resourse for climber workouts) Wednesday I drink, thursday climbing gym, Friday drink and climb big one day on the weekends.  All this and I still suck, but it helps me not drink everynight! 

Post up!
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Jon Howard

Pat

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Re: Training
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2010, 04:16:25 PM »

I like to use Clyde Soles' book - Climbing: Training for Peak Performance.  It has a lot of information on different cardio zones, nutrition, (including my favorite, "Beer isn't the worst thing you can drink after a hard work out - it's usually the french fries and nachos") and strength training, etc. 

At the back of the book, it has a variety of training regimes from weekend warrior to expeditions.  I've used the book the past 5 years for various Northwest alpine climbs and have been pretty happy with the results.

I definitely agree with Mountain Athlete - Rob Shauls has some pretty crazy routines that work you pretty hard. mtnathlete.com

-Pat
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meclimber

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Re: Training
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2010, 04:56:34 PM »

Nice, Pat.  I've gotten some good torture, I mean workout ideas from gymjones.com also.  Mark Twight, what else can I say!
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Jon Howard

M_Sprague

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Re: Training
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2010, 05:28:50 PM »

Try one of this woman's workouts http://www.bodyrock.tv/ I haven't picked up the right bra yet, so I am waiting to start ;D They actually do look like realy good workouts and I like the way she doesn't require a lot of gear. She actually says on her site that she was starting to rock climb
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strandman

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Re: Training
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2010, 05:56:06 PM »

Abuse in any form is good. ;) My old bud Karl Mallmen trained like a fiend- 500 sit-ups, run 20 miles, 2 hours on the board etc, AND dank very heavy ! Climbed 12+ on all types of routes.
I have found mtn biking uphill at 9,000' to be nice, with a pack. I kept my drilling up to snuff by drilling some of my house's anchor bolts by hand - 1/2" x 5", but hell it's only concrete not conway granite !!!!
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bennybrew

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Re: Training
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2010, 05:57:12 PM »

So who does it, who hates it and what do you do?

I only get outside 1-2 days a week, typically one day climbing and the other bouldering for a few hours depending on the season.  When I'm motivated (like now, Yosemite only a few months off) I Drink on Monday,try weight training Tuesday (mountain athelete is a great resourse for climber workouts) Wednesday I drink, thursday climbing gym, Friday drink and climb big one day on the weekends.  All this and I still suck, but it helps me not drink everynight! 

Post up!

monday i drink beer. tuesday i drink beer. wednesday i drink beer. thursday i drink rum with a beer chaser. friday i drink beer. and on the weekends i drink beer. such is the life of a brewer.

occasionally i push/pull (http://www.exrx.net/WeightTraining/Instructions.html) and, as often as my drinking allows, i row.
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MAmedic

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Re: Training
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2010, 06:06:42 PM »

Give these a try.  The Y in my town has them and they are great.  Expensive to purchase but probably could be macgyver-ed. http://www.fitnessanywhere.com/
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Nick D

llamero

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Re: Training
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2010, 06:46:24 PM »

My wife has been training for law enforcement, so we've been doing a lot of running (2-3 miles in the morning 5 days a week) and strength training 2-3 days a week, with excellent results (i.e. last season it took 2 months to get up to V1+ and this season I was there the first day out, and the wife was tackling problems for the first time ever). 

The key to any intense training is rest!  Rest muscles until they are no longer sore (usually 48-72 hours) before training them again.  If they are still sore, do NOT strength train them, or you will injure yourself, and/or actually make yourself weaker.  After every strength training session we have a total rest day where we either do nothing or just a short run.  We also make sure we get a good night's sleep every night.

Also strength training sessions should only last 35-45 minutes including warm-up sets.  If you can go longer, your not pushing with enough intensity.

Since rock climbing requires stamina and excellent strength to weight ratio, I've been following wrestling work-out regimens as a guide line since that sport has very similar considerations.  If you're in VERY good shape (can squat and bench press 1.5x your body weight) you can also begin to incorporate plyometrics into your strength training routines which will really boost your results.

The best site I've found for strength training is www.bodybuilding.com/fun/index.html, primarily because they have videos of every exercise so you can be sure you're using proper technique.  For plyometrics, try www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/plyometric-training.html.

Good luck!
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It is better to not summit and wish you had, than to summit and wish you hadn't.

bluesnpolitics

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Re: Training
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2010, 03:28:55 PM »

35-45 min including warm up and cool down?!? if you do 15 min of warm up and 15 min of cool down, that leaves 5-15 of actual strength training! Am I misunderstanding what you are including in that 35-45 min? Also, squat and benchpress don't mean squat (and benchpress?) for climbing. Those focus on large muscles that are rarely maxed when climbing. Swimming is probably better. Paddling or working construction are good. I climbed my best after a summer of whitewater canoeing. Abuse in any form is good!

I also like Clyde Soles book mostly because it focusses on xtraining. The back of the book is good, but I suck at schedules. One of my tricks is to leave free weights and a pull up bar (doorframe that I can hook my tools over) out in the open all of the time. That way, when I'm confused about where I am or what to do next, I can waste time in a more productive way. It isn't great training, but it keeps my otherwise wiry self slightly more muscular. I know that upper body strength is my weakness, so I rarely focus on my legs (I average about 65 miles of city biking per week to take care of that).
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meclimber

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Re: Training
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2010, 03:40:59 PM »

sooooooo..........where does the beer fit in that 45 minutes?  Good gym session last night, followed by a couple Stone IPA's and a slice of pie!!!  mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
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Jon Howard

llamero

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Re: Training
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2010, 04:20:04 PM »

35-45 min including warm up and cool down?!? if you do 15 min of warm up and 15 min of cool down, that leaves 5-15 of actual strength training! Am I misunderstanding what you are including in that 35-45 min?

I was referring to warm-up sets, not the warm-up itself.  A warm-up set is a set of lifts done at a lower weight to warm-up the muscle before doing the working sets.  A common strategy to doing this is pyramid sets.  On top of warm-up sets, you're absolutely right that one should warm-up, cool down and stretch which will make the whole workout a bit over an hour long.

The squats and bench press weren't workouts I was recommending, but just a metric several papers have suggested to go by before performing plyometrics, primarily because plyometrics put a heavy strain on joints and tendons, and you want to be sure they can take the strain.  For example, if you can squat 1.5 times your weight, it's a assumed your knees etc, have been long since conditioned to take heavy impacts through whatever workouts you used to get to that level (rock climbing, running, etc.).
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strandman

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Re: Training
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2010, 06:48:42 PM »

ya know what's a really good work -out ? standing on a small stance hand drilling a bolt. then doing it again..... Try it out on some shit bit of rock and see. Also intensive TR'ing will get you going, just go for it many laps.

Weight training may be use ful for overall conditioning, but i think it's virtually useless for climbing.
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tstorm11

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Re: Training
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2010, 09:45:40 PM »

"Weight training may be use ful for overall conditioning, but i think it's virtually useless for climbing."

Bullshit....Tell that to the climber who is training with kettlebells, sandbags, olympic lifts, wieghted pullups and other forms of torture

If you are refering to the Globogyms when you mean weight training then I see your point

http://www.crossfitsunnyvale.com/
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sneoh

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Re: Training
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2010, 11:39:19 PM »


I probably have it all wrong ... to me climbing is the best training for climbing.  Over spring and summer, I try to do lots of mostly moderate routes (about 1.5 number grades below one's max) to get and stay fit, only occasionally 'working' a hard route to keep things interesting.  I normally lose a little weight in the summer, so come fall, it is time to step it up and send them projects.  I try to dedicate a month in the winter to indoor bouldering to build power but often I lose focus and wonder back to just doing routes.  :)

-S.Neoh

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meclimber

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Re: Training
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2010, 06:32:14 AM »

i couldn't agree more s. neoh, but until my wife lets me quit my job and climb full time, it stays the same 1-2 days a week of climbing.  Big goals in mind!

Strand, I disagree too about the weight training.  Traditional 'lifting', i agree, is not really usefull at all to climbing.  But like tsstorm mentioned, more specific trainng is great.  Turkish get-ups, renegade man maker, kettle swings, all sorts of medicine ball stuff,  You should see what kind of pain to granite pavers can induce!!!
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Jon Howard
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