Author Topic: accident last weekend  (Read 2077 times)

Offline redpt

  • NEClimbs Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 10
accident last weekend
« on: May 07, 2010, 04:31:42 pm »

Offline sparrow

  • NEClimbs Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2010, 04:34:12 pm »
That story is a little unclear, to put it mildly.  Anyone know what happened?

Offline strandman

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 5829
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2010, 09:45:40 pm »
prolly involved trees

Offline fresh

  • NEClimbs Junior Member
  • **
  • Posts: 93
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2010, 08:37:48 pm »
it's like reading english translated into japanese and back into english.

this totally sucks, greg is a regular at metrorock and a super nice guy.

Offline JakeDatc

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 705
  • "Don't worry, this won't hurt me a bit"
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2010, 09:59:56 pm »
From the comments section
"As a witness to the accident, and a friend of Greg's and Lauren's, I find a lot of these comments inappropriate and offensive - and the article to be poorly written as far as really portraying what happened. One, they weren't hiking. Two, clearly not written by a climber. Greg took a lead fall. Lauren had an ATC. She lost her footing and pulled into the rock herself on the catch and loosened up on the brake just enough that to try to regain the brake securely she burned her hand. And while yes there were many many rescuers both vthere helping, volunteers and paid, may I also mention the half dozen climbers who gave up their afternoon to help bring Greg down safely to the road. "

hope he gets better soon.  That litter carry could not have been fun so props to everyone who helped out with that. 
"I really don't know who act like if he have the true." -Champoing

Offline lucky luke

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1763
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2010, 06:26:12 pm »
In old day, we said poor belay position. On whitehorse, I did the same mistake. My belay wasn't in tension for a pull in the direction of a leader fall. Fortunately, my leader didn't fall. In sport, I think that there is no belay most of the time. Isn't it?

Offline sneoh

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 2112
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2010, 09:00:12 pm »
In sport, I think that there is no belay most of the time. Isn't it?
I do not think one can generalize.  There are bad belayers in both trad and sport climbing.  On the flip side, there are a lot of good belayers in both.

The use of auto-lockers like Gri-Gri is more prevalent at sport crags.  IMHO, it takes a bit of practice to give a safe, good, and dynamic belay using a Gri-Gri.  The tendency of a lot of users is to have too much slack out all the time and pay no attention to the climber.  I happen to believe this is wrong.  And this perhaps also leads to one thinking that "there is no belay most of the time" in sport climbing.

« Last Edit: June 27, 2010, 09:02:14 pm by sneoh »

"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

Offline lucky luke

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1763
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2010, 05:35:19 pm »
I do not think one can generalize.  There are bad belayers in both trad and sport climbing.  On the flip side, there are a lot of good belayers in both.

Sorry for my english Sneoh. By belay I was thinking of a sling around a tree or a back up stopper to catch the weight of the leader fall. I wasn't thinking about how the people belay. I was thinking that if the women was tie to a tree with a sling, she didn't "lost her footing and pulled into the rock herself on the catch".

Offline sneoh

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 2112
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2010, 06:44:19 pm »
Please, no need to apologize.  I understand now.  Yes, I agree that anchoring the belayer is rarely done these days in the arena of sport climbing.

Because I know nothing of this particular case, I do not wish to implicate anyone of wrong doing.  For me, being rather small in size myself, I have had lots of experience being yanked up by falling climbers who weigh significantly more than I do, whether I am anchored or not.  These days, if I have to belay someone who outweighs me more than 30 lb or so, I will try to use an auto-locker like a Gri-Gri in order to reduce the chance of the rope running away from me during a leader fall.

-SNeoh

"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

Offline llamero

  • NEClimbs Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 151
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #9 on: June 28, 2010, 07:14:59 pm »
I've belayed someone more than 40 pounds heavier than me on a simple ATC, and it is difficult to hold someone like that even when the rope isn't shock loaded.  It may be a bit awkward, but I've been wondering if in a situation like that (i.e. you left the Grigri at home but still want to climb) you couldn't just put an autoblock on the brake line.  This way if the rope load got to be too much, the autoblock could be used.

My wife and I also just invested in an ATC-Guide in addition to our Grigri, and I can vouch that when used in with the friction teeth on the brake side, the device is practically autolocking.  Also, if you have a person who climbs fast on lead, you wouldn't have the same problem paying out rope quickly like one does with a Grigri (unless I'm doing something very wrong).

It is better to not summit and wish you had, than to summit and wish you hadn't.

Offline meclimber

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1014
  • Climb for your own reasons.
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #10 on: June 28, 2010, 08:06:28 pm »
Nice, the atc guide or reverso is the way to roll if trying to consolidate devices.  IMHO, dump everything else and just use the guide.  A gri-gri is lazy man bolt clipping day device or for solo aid or solo belay's.  You can use an auto-block device for so many things; rescue/self rescue, multiple ropes, multiple climbers, multi-pitch, ropes of most diameter, etc.

Oh wait, i just read the topic, way off topic, carry on.
Jon Howard

Offline sneoh

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 2112
Re: accident last weekend
« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2010, 08:25:22 pm »

Continuing in the wrong direction -
I have a device quite similar to the ATC Guide.  Yes, it is pretty good and I like it (esp when I need to rap).

With some practice and skill, once can ply out rope pretty quickly and safely with a Gri-Gri.
I set routes in a gym so a Gri-Gri is almost a must-have for that.


"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ