Author Topic: Learning to climb trad  (Read 3543 times)

strandman

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #15 on: August 16, 2010, 10:07:47 AM »
Of course motivation is very key. "If get this route, I'm drinkin" . The only issue is that harder/serious routes may require harder drinkin'   ;D

epoch

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2010, 07:13:50 AM »
Of course motivation is very key. "If get this route, I'm drinkin" . The only issue is that harder/serious routes may require harder drinkin'   ;D
Eyem know engrish teeacher, but yor grammar sucks!

Offline JBro

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Posts: 1383
  • Doing God's work
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2010, 09:10:07 AM »
If you have the time and cash to drive down there a lot, the Gunks is really a great place to learn how to trad climb, especially if you don't have more experienced folks to climb with. As long as you know the basics about placing safe gear and building anchors, you can start at 5.1 and work your way up through the grades. And the easy routes don't suck like they usually do in most other areas.

Have a quiche, now, or maybe a tort.  You deserve it!
-bristolpipe

I like to keep things simple, even if it's faaaken painful and miserable.
-Stoney Middleton

This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.
-Friar Tuck

bentleyclimber

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2010, 09:15:50 AM »
I ended up going the self-taught path; read john longs book on anchors, bought some basic gear and sewed up my first 5.4. It was an absolute blast and I'm still alive to boot.

strandman

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2010, 09:28:32 AM »
Eyem know engrish teeacher, but yor grammar sucks!
Too much drinkin' and serious routes I reckon

Offline llamero

  • NEClimbs Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 151
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2010, 07:36:09 PM »
I ended up going the self-taught path; read john longs book on anchors, bought some basic gear and sewed up my first 5.4. It was an absolute blast and I'm still alive to boot.

This is similar to how I moved from indoor to outdoor.  I read two really good guide books to get different perspectives on how to use pro (yes, there are different techniques that are equally valid, you just have to find what works for you).  I also read the "Accidents In North American Mountaineering" journals to learn what could go wrong, and how to prevent these problems.  I then went down to Monument Cove (a bouldering area) and practiced gear placements, anchor building and escaping belays.  Also, since I was going to be climbing at Otter Cliffs, I practiced rope ascending by simply setting up a rope in the tree and working my way up.

Finally, after feeling comfortable with all the systems, I setup an anchor atop "In the groove" (5.5) at Otter Cliffs and climbed it clean in the first go despite being understandably nervous.  Been climbing ever since, and it's been more fun each time I go.
It is better to not summit and wish you had, than to summit and wish you hadn't.

DLottmann

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2010, 03:43:21 PM »
This is similar to how I moved from indoor to outdoor.  I read two really good guide books to get different perspectives on how to use pro (yes, there are different techniques that are equally valid, you just have to find what works for you).  I also read the "Accidents In North American Mountaineering" journals to learn what could go wrong, and how to prevent these problems.  I then went down to Monument Cove (a bouldering area) and practiced gear placements, anchor building and escaping belays.  Also, since I was going to be climbing at Otter Cliffs, I practiced rope ascending by simply setting up a rope in the tree and working my way up.

Finally, after feeling comfortable with all the systems, I setup an anchor atop "In the groove" (5.5) at Otter Cliffs and climbed it clean in the first go despite being understandably nervous.  Been climbing ever since, and it's been more fun each time I go.

I believe ANAM is one of the best yearly publications a new climber can read to get aquatinted with all the potential mistakes one can make. Learning from others mistakes is a most valuable tool.

I also studied Freedom of the Hills and How to Rock Climb by John Long. These two texts, plus trying to climb with experienced peers, and perhaps 1 or 2 private guided lessons a year can greatly increase your learning curve and safety margins during your first couple years learning the ropes.

little lil

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2010, 05:25:10 PM »
and watch cliffhanger   ;)

sneoh

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2010, 06:40:25 PM »
and watch cliffhanger   ;)
Where can I buy one of them bolt "guns" the Stallone character used in the film; it installs bolt *and* hanger with one squeeze of the trigger.  NICE.

Joe_Re

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2010, 08:24:17 PM »
Where can I buy one of them bolt "guns" the Stallone character used in the film; it installs bolt *and* hanger with one squeeze of the trigger.  NICE.

I haven't seen the movie, but I hear Stallone was so badass, he didn't even clip the bolts.

little lil

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #25 on: August 19, 2010, 12:21:21 AM »
I haven't seen the movie, but I hear Stallone was so badass, he didn't even clip the bolts.

and climbs ice with his bare hands.  could have saved the money for my ice tools and just toughened up a little instead.   :-\

Joe_Re

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #26 on: August 20, 2010, 08:44:37 AM »
and climbs ice with his bare hands.  could have saved the money for my ice tools and just toughened up a little instead.   :-\

Something to aspire to.

bentleyclimber

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #27 on: August 27, 2010, 09:19:22 AM »
Hey, I'm looking for some tips for rope management at hanging belays. I was practicing building belays and swinging leads at a local crag and realized that I had no technique to handle the situation and quickly had a mess of rope with strands hanging 30 feet down. Thanks for any advice.

-Ben

Offline llamero

  • NEClimbs Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 151
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2010, 09:32:26 AM »
This is a pretty good solution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/78647489@N00/2899374005

You can either pass it through a sling on the anchor as in the photo, or across your lap if you're sitting a little ways away from the anchor.
It is better to not summit and wish you had, than to summit and wish you hadn't.

DLottmann

  • Guest
Re: Learning to climb trad
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2010, 03:30:12 PM »
Hey, I'm looking for some tips for rope management at hanging belays...

At a true hanging belay lap coil the rope over your tie-in. If swinging leads start with bigger loops on each side working to smaller loops. This will feed off better for the next lead. If leading in blocks start with small loops and work to bigger loops. After 2nd ties in carefully "flip" the whole stack over onto their anchor attachment. The small loops should feed smooth for the next lead.

With a little practice this is easy. If the wall below is smooth with zero chance of a catch you can make some huge loops. If there is a ledge use it and just make a rope pile. The "pancake" flip takes a bit of practice but re-stacking only takes 45 seconds.