NEClimbs.com forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Reading the forum on your cell phone? There's an easier way. We've enabled a Tapatalk app that makes browsing the forum a whole lot easier. Check it out in the iPhone or Android store if you don't own it already.

Pages: [1] 2   Go Down

Author Topic: How do you train for ice climbing?  (Read 1219 times)

darwined

  • Guest
How do you train for ice climbing?
« on: October 10, 2012, 05:21:20 PM »

hey all,

I'm trying to break into the 5's this season, but I could use a little help.  Is there anything relatively inexpensive I could build, in the garage, to help me train for ice.  If you've seen the "Wide Boyz" movie, this is sort of what I was thinking(only ice specific).  If you haven't seen the "Wide Boyz" movie, do it! 

I will prolly be able to get plenty of mileage this winter.  I would like to be strong enough to capitalize on the ice.


Cheers
Logged

tradmanclimbz

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3836
  • Nick Goldsmith
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2012, 07:09:35 PM »

Hang your tools from a beam in the garage and start doing pull ups and dead hangs. start running or hikeing or something to get your cardio up. drink whisky and shag sheep. that should do it 8)
Logged

darwined

  • Guest
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2012, 08:04:45 PM »

Shaggin' sheep is for rapp-bolters. :P
Logged

ELM

  • NEClimbs Senior Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 333
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2012, 08:40:20 PM »

  I've been thinking about this topic too. I really was lacking last year in my ability to do real steep stuff.
     I haven't make this yet but my thought was to take two 2x6's. Drill 1/2 diameter holes in them with a spade bit; the holes would angle down at 20 degrees. The pattern of holes could vary but something uniform would be good too. Then mount the 2x6's side by side at the desired angle you wish; I was aiming for vertical. Strap on the mono points and go.
   You could augment this with climbing holds...or even the "Ice Holdz".
Logged
Ed Matt
" I release my attention: because of you now I am in danger!!! " -Champ

DLottmann

  • Guest
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2012, 12:31:43 AM »

It may just be my growing beer gut talking but the issue with Grade 4 and Grade 5 ice IMO is it is 45% mental, 45% technique, and 10% strength... While I only have 4-5 grade 5's under my belt I'm quite solid on Grade 4... and so much is condition dependent... but IMO with modern tools/crampons Grade 5 and 4 have little difference in terms of strength needed...
Logged

tradmanclimbz

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3836
  • Nick Goldsmith
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2012, 04:29:37 AM »

Depends on which grade 5's you are talking about...... I have not found any excersize that replicates the actual swinging and placeing of the tools under stress.  Going on the principal that climbing is at least 80% mental and that strength builds confidence and confidence takes care of 90% of the mental aspect it stands to reason that getting in shape for ice season is a good idea...

Logged

MT

  • NEClimbs Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 177
  • I love YaBB 1G - SP1!
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2012, 06:49:58 AM »

Would agree that 5s are mostly a mental thing, but there is undoubtedly some strength/fitness issues that come into play on some routes.

I don't know what the relative proportions of strength/technical ability/mental fortitude is required to lead 5s, but if you find yourself relying on physical strength to get up them, you're probably not ready.

Ice screws are great and all, but, for me, leading ice still remains a "leader does not fall" proposition. That's probably why I've never gotten comfortable on 5s :)

Good luck,

Mike
Logged

ELM

  • NEClimbs Senior Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 333
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2012, 07:31:43 AM »

    You are right that you shouldn't need to totally muscle your way up. You do however need to have a base fitness level to climb it comfortably. For me it was my calves that were lacking.
   I am hoping my ring will allow me to do some basic hanging off my toes to build my claves.
   Last year I also had what seem like body position issues. On vertical terrain I felt out of balance; I couldn't seem to find that sweet spot where your hips are tilted toward the ice and your torso is tilted away.
Logged
Ed Matt
" I release my attention: because of you now I am in danger!!! " -Champ

fresh

  • NEClimbs Junior Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 89
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2012, 11:10:45 AM »

I think most of ice climbing is actually reading the medium rather than using strength, technique or mental toughness. I'm skeptical of home training methods because of this. power is never a bad thing to have in excess, but it's the wrong thing to focus on. the best thing you can do is simply to get mileage in as many different types of conditions as possible--rotten & aerated, cold and brittle, wet and warm, blue and plastic.

once you've learned to read the medium, it's all about mastering the movement. as many people have said, if you're getting exhausted on an ice climb, you've already failed. if this happens to you, getting stronger and tougher will not solve the underlying problems in your approach. there is a right way to move on ice. it's almost like an algorithm. place one tool high, hang like a monkey, get two good foot placements at knee level, stand up straight, hips in, repeat. after you've mastered that, learn to get bomber tool placements with as few swings as possible. if you can master these two skills, 90% of your technique problems are solved.

the rest involve awkward positions that the algorithm won't help you at all for. for example, any time your shoulders are forced into the ice for some reason, forcing you to chicken-wing your next tool placement. I personally have far too much mileage in awkward positions, usually because I'm not trusting my tool placements enough to lean out on them. learn to avoid them in the first place.

it helps to seek out climbs that are awkward for you. hobbit couloir, hassig's direct, and super goofer's all stick out in my mind as climbs where a little better technique would have saved me a lot of energy. anything that's weird will be great for you.

ok, my rambling has far exceeded my credibility on the subject. for better tips than I could ever give, read everything will gadd has written on ice technique on his blog. this post in particular: http://willgadd.com/category/blog/page/7/

have fun out there!
Logged

DLottmann

  • Guest
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2012, 12:01:55 PM »

+1 Fresh, great post
Logged

pappy

  • NEClimbs Senior Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 301
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2012, 02:51:29 PM »

I don't train for ice other than climbing it, there's no reason to. As everyone else says, it's mostly mental and knowledge of the medium, and good technique flows from that. I never get flamed on 5-5+ anymore (The last time I got flamed on ice was on Artificial Gravity in the Daks, but even then I suspect I allowed intimidation screw up my head, and technique went out the window). Last year I went back up to the Mindbender ampitheater for the first time since the mid-80s, when the idea of actually leading Mindbender was stupifying. Somehow I didn't get the memo that MB is a 2 pitch climb and led it in one long pitch (which I'm sure is what most here do), and at the top I was mentally tired, but not physically. It ain't the gear either: I'm still using my 30 year old Kastinger boots and the Prophets I bought in the mid-90s (though the difference that modern screws make vs. those god awful Chouinard screws cannot be overstated). It's really just coming to a mental accommodation with the concept that as bizarre and alien as climbing ice is, pure ice is really not that difficult. It's a lot harder and takes a lot longer to become a competent 5.9 climber than it does to lead NEI 5.
Logged
If you're gonna be stupid, you gotta be tough.

tradmanclimbz

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3836
  • Nick Goldsmith
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2012, 04:58:13 PM »

Still think that haveing good overall fitness going into the season is critical. The season started so late last year that My first day out was Dec 26th and it was crappy rainy before that so no rock climbing. I usually use hunting season to get in shape tromping arround the woods in hill country. This year it was 3 weeks between hunting and my first ice day and no climbing for longer than that. I lead the Black dike on the 26th and I felt mentaly fine but ran out of gas on the last 50ft of the right hand mixed finish. Did not hydrate properly and never ate anything. I got up it ok but really used every last ounce of gas in the tank. I definatly feel that it was mostly fitness related meltdown. 
Edit. I am getting a bit grey in the beard so that may affect the strength/endurance aspect a bit?
« Last Edit: October 11, 2012, 09:39:37 PM by tradmanclimbz »
Logged

DLottmann

  • Guest
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2012, 09:15:12 PM »

It's a lot harder and takes a lot longer to become a competent 5.9 climber than it does to lead NEI 5.

I agree, though many 5.10+ trad climbers are petrified of ice... it's only because of limited time on the medium...
Logged

tradmanclimbz

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3836
  • Nick Goldsmith
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2012, 09:54:50 PM »

There is a huge difference in danger from leading g or pg rated 5.10 rock VS grade 5 ice where even a fall on a good screw may end up in and open fracture of the lower leg. then there are all those times when the gear is not good due to thin ice, airated ice, rotten ice etc.  not to mention the fact that the ice may not be bonded to the cliff or the pillar may be brittle and waiting to colaps with you on it...   Just the sound of some of the more sketchy terrain when you are climbing it is enough to turn you into a sport climber....   the seriousness factor is way beyond most of the rock climbing we have around here..   
Logged

apbt1976

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 419
Re: How do you train for ice climbing?
« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2012, 10:50:49 PM »

There is a huge difference in danger from leading g or pg rated 5.10 rock VS grade 5 ice where even a fall on a good screw may end up in and open fracture of the lower leg. then there are all those times when the gear is not good due to thin ice, airated ice, rotten ice etc.  not to mention the fact that the ice may not be bonded to the cliff or the pillar may be brittle and waiting to colaps with you on it...   Just the sound of some of the more sketchy terrain when you are climbing it is enough to turn you into a sport climber....   the seriousness factor is way beyond most of the rock climbing we have around here..

Well said and that is my biggest limiting factor as a ice climber. Something about the way you said that made me feel much better about having a healthy respect/fear of ice as most of the time i feel like a giant sissy and wonder why cant i just get over it everything is gonna be ok.

At times rock climbing i get scared but nothing like when i am scared ice climbing. Scared rock climbing slow think better and proceed. Scared ice climbing and any rational thought goes out the window and out pilot kicks in. Not good i know i have quite a bit to learn.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.143 seconds with 23 queries.