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Author Topic: Where's the best layback in NH?  (Read 3677 times)

strandman

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2012, 10:44:30 AM »

The hard bit on Possessed is a pinch layback and reach into a finger stack... solid 11++    :'(

And don't use the sucker hold to the right..pulls you out of the layback position
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old_school

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2012, 11:54:04 AM »

Crack in the Woods and Screaming Yellow Zonkers baby...that will hone that layback tecnhique and quick.  ;)
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sneoh

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2012, 12:03:21 PM »

Pure laybacks in NE are pretty rare;
This too is my impression but I could be wrong

sneoh- are you talking about the famous "finnish crossstep" move  the inside out foot plant ?
Is this ( http://www.mountainproject.com/v/105989086 ) what you mean?
Inside flag is sort of like it, except you do not actually put a lot of weight on the inside foot.
Instead, I "cock" the inside foot so that the top of the shoe (toebox/rand) is pressed against the rock, creating counter pressure/balance for the outside/planted foot (often lower than the inside foot).
If you were to climb an arete with one hand actually going around the arete, an inside flag can significantly reduce the barn-door effect.
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"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

M_Sprague

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2012, 12:50:52 PM »

It looks like Lee is just doing a step through in that picture, Soon.

Glad somebody mentioned Screaming Yellow Zonkers. The hardest moves on that route are high step laybacks rather than jamming. Zonked Out, right next to it, also has a layback crux.

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sneoh

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2012, 01:33:56 PM »

Glad somebody mentioned Screaming Yellow Zonkers. The hardest moves on that route are high step laybacks rather than jamming. Zonked Out, right next to it, also has a layback crux.
Just one move or two of layback, not continuous, right?
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M_Sprague

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #20 on: October 31, 2012, 01:55:25 PM »

Not continuous, more like a sequence, jam, and another sequence. It sounds like the OP could use a good arete climb like Fall From Grace on Cannon. http://www.mountainproject.com/v/fall-from-grace-/107815601 How far out of the way do you want to go, and how hard?  ;) I can think of a few aretes that require a hike.
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JakeDatc

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #21 on: October 31, 2012, 04:54:28 PM »

sneoh- are you talking about the famous "finnish crossstep" move  the inside out foot plant ?

how about this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmJUx_ArQaU
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DLottmann

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2012, 05:22:17 PM »

sneoh- are you talking about the famous "finnish crossstep" move  the inside out foot plant ?

how about this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmJUx_ArQaU

I was about to go looking for this video! Classic! Love the back-stepping, or drop-knee, or what ever that is that he does during this... Lucky Luke would know the correct term...
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darwined

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #23 on: October 31, 2012, 05:32:55 PM »

Not continuous, more like a sequence, jam, and another sequence. It sounds like the OP could use a good arete climb like Fall From Grace on Cannon. http://www.mountainproject.com/v/fall-from-grace-/107815601 How far out of the way do you want to go, and how hard?  ;) I can think of a few aretes that require a hike.

Gimme the good stuff. ;)
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strandman

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #24 on: October 31, 2012, 06:20:30 PM »

if you want an arete to practice laybacking...

Faux Paux ( what the fuck is wrong with my spelling ?

Fall from Grace is hard,very hard... fucking rap bolts.. it's working name was Jim-Z -Arete as jimmy S was working it..ground up. We tried and failed, but it would have gone,

nobody does it now so..4 stars
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sneoh

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #25 on: October 31, 2012, 06:31:19 PM »

Jake, thanks for sending the link out.  It is great!  All that foot step-throughs and the funky "drop-knee" opposition with the non-plant foot (to create more secure footing) is wonderful to watch.  Can't wait to try it out on rock and fall off!! :):)
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strandman

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #26 on: October 31, 2012, 06:34:21 PM »

sneoh- are you talking about the famous "finnish crossstep" move  the inside out foot plant ?

how about this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmJUx_ArQaU

I was about to go looking for this video! Classic! Love the back-stepping, or drop-knee, or what ever that is that he does during this... Lucky Luke would know the correct term...
The correct term would be "climbing"
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lucky luke

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #27 on: October 31, 2012, 09:52:07 PM »

how about this
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmJUx_ArQaU

Look like a kind of stemming with the feet? Some told me that we can do bridging in book of solenity. I tried it a couple of time, but cheating the move. Stemming is also a find technique to practice. In remission, second pitch, the stemming make the move a lot easier.

he have time to place pro. how he place the rope in the layback is also interesting. The rope was never in a position where he can finish up side down on a fall. He felt the distance of a gym wall. when I was training more regularly, aid climbing, work technique, etc, I was able to commit on long safe trad fall. 

 
« Last Edit: November 01, 2012, 09:13:19 AM by lucky luke »
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sneoh

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #28 on: October 31, 2012, 10:51:35 PM »

I just came across this ( http://www.mountainproject.com/v/105962116 ) purely by accident.  It seems on-topic :)
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"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

lucky luke

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Re: Where's the best layback in NH?
« Reply #29 on: November 01, 2012, 09:54:57 AM »

I just came across this ( http://www.mountainproject.com/v/105962116 ) purely by accident.  It seems on-topic :)
As the question is to work layback technique, I don't think that training for flagging is on-topic. The reason is because i ask myself the question what did I want when I am working a technique. In my opinion, first, we need to know the limit of the technique, which are our strenght and the barn door when the layback is too open. Second, we can learn when it is best to use layback or other technique or two or three technique togheter.

I know that darwin is not a beginer if he wrote on neice.com under the same name, but the question is interesting for a beginer. Do they have to put all togheter technique, or should they learn the basic technique and go throught more complex situation gradually. Personally, I prefer to learn the basic to have a deep understanding of what I am doing. In that way, I can climb every where a layback technique and don't have to be accostume to the rock before.

As the question is to work a route with layback, you just have to know that it is not a layback that you must do but a flag. And the photo is on topic.  Look at some one else do the route and imitate him. Personally, I don't find it fun. Climbing is useless and there is no gain to be at the top of a 5.6 or 5.10 if you like to be in the vertical world, except the social pressure. I climb to relax and to be out of competitive behavior of work. My goal is to strech in a nice environment at my level, which can be different depending on my mood. Guessing the movement with as a penalty the risk of a fall, keeping my mind open at the danger and using my imagination to find good placement for my nuts, keeping my cardiac rhytme at a low level and staying calm in stressfull situation is appealing to me. All kind of stuff that I don't find when I clip a bolt.   

   
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