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Author Topic: Acceptable risk and soloing  (Read 2268 times)

kenreville

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #45 on: March 26, 2013, 08:47:07 PM »

We sure gave it a go eh, laddie?
Live free or die.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 08:52:02 PM by kenreville »
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smartpig

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #46 on: March 26, 2013, 09:49:56 PM »

We sure gave it a go eh, laddie?
Live free or die.

Sure did,Youth!


The last sentence, I believe, in Maurice Herzog's classic account of the first ascent of Annapurna 1 goes as thus:

"There are many more Annapurnas in the lives of men." 

What a great metaphor.....I read it in a global sense...what can you achieve beyond the realm of climbing?  ....In all aspects of a lifetime.
That is my Annapurna today. 
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Jamie Cunningham
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smartpig

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #47 on: March 26, 2013, 09:55:23 PM »

Nepal (or any other climbing destination) is not all about climbing....
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Jamie Cunningham
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Admin Al

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #48 on: March 26, 2013, 10:12:15 PM »

wow... incredible adventure aye Jamie?
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smartpig

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #49 on: March 27, 2013, 04:45:34 AM »

Thanks all.  John, you got that right in the other thread "Education": it's all in the doing.  As Tilman said, "put your boots on and go!"

Cheers, Mates! Bottoms up!
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Jamie Cunningham
Franconia, NH

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markvnh

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #50 on: March 27, 2013, 08:42:53 AM »

Thanks for sharing Jamie! Great stuff!
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lucky luke

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #51 on: March 27, 2013, 11:26:26 AM »

The last sentence, I believe, in Maurice Herzog's classic account of the first ascent of Annapurna 1 goes as thus:

"There are many more Annapurnas in the lives of men." 

What a great metaphor.....I read it in a global sense...what can you achieve beyond the realm of climbing?  ....In all aspects of a lifetime.

This is many great adventure.

Many because i doubt that ou decide one day to climb annapurna, take your crampon and buy your plane ticket.

What are the sacrifice, the training, the employer that you had to tolerate, the first encounter with death, the probabilistic risk assesment etc...

When we red the forum, few time ago, I had the impression that many of you said:

Look how wonderfull it is, how my life was great and amasing, how happy I am....
but not for you my son...too risky!
 :-*
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kenreville

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #52 on: March 28, 2013, 07:32:31 AM »

The last sentence, I believe, in Maurice Herzog's classic account of the first ascent of Annapurna 1 goes as thus:

"There are many more Annapurnas in the lives of men." 

What a great metaphor.....I read it in a global sense...what can you achieve beyond the realm of climbing?  ....In all aspects of a lifetime.

This is many great adventure.

Many because i doubt that ou decide one day to climb annapurna, take your crampon and buy your plane ticket.
Actually, that's pretty much what we did.

What are the sacrifice, the training, the employer that you had to tolerate, the first encounter with death, the probabilistic risk assesment etc...
There was no sacrifice other than shelling out $7k. Training was continue doing what we did whenever we could-climb. The only concern James and I had was pulmonary edema.

When we red the forum, few time ago, I had the impression that many of you said:

Look how wonderfull it is, how my life was great and amasing, how happy I am....
but not for you my son...too risky!
 :-*
Do you mean "my son" (don't have one), or "you" son?
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lucky luke

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Re: Acceptable risk and soloing
« Reply #53 on: March 29, 2013, 11:58:49 AM »

What are the sacrifice, the training, the employer that you had to tolerate, the first encounter with death, the probabilistic risk assesment etc...
There was no sacrifice other than shelling out $7k. Training was continue doing what we did whenever we could-climb. The only concern James and I had was pulmonary edema.

When we red the forum, few time ago, I had the impression that many of you said:

Look how wonderfull it is, how my life was great and amasing, how happy I am....
but not for you my son...too risky!
 :-*
Do you mean "my son" (don't have one), or "you" son?
[/quote]
When you work five days a week in an industry, want to be with your girlfriend, eat and sleep...the time you can spend on climbing is a little bit less than when your works is guiding, or when the cliff is in your backyard. I know some climber who climbed two 5.10 route at cathedral from six to nine as a warm up before going to work. it is six hours of training at least. And you are close to mt washington. Taking a hike with a fifty pounds pack sack with a wood frame, as i saw in the early days, as a training...it is not what many people can do. All that hard training are often omit to say, but are the most important think to come back safe, unburry.

It is obvious that I have to follow a training less interesting to onsight 5.10 than climbing as much as I can as I am in a city. I just forget to train my ankle for a year and feel weaker on my feet when I climbed. I trained my arms, but not my feet...so I hang up more than friction and edgin.

If you want to be modern, want to make climbing for every body, you also have to think about oder reality of life than climbing.   
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