Author Topic: The knees  (Read 1235 times)

Offline Nico

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The knees
« on: September 06, 2013, 10:41:17 AM »
56, work hard to stay in good shape. Have been going to Crossfit for 3 years and like it, no injuries. The routines frequently involve dead lifts, lunges, squats, thrusters and other work involving deep knee bends, often weighted. Box jumps too. Question: In the last 2 months or so my knees have been a little sore, from time to time and moderately but it worries me. Are there exercises I should be avoiding or modifying?

Offline David_G48

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Re: The knees
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2013, 11:04:27 AM »
I know that it is recommended to not do deep knee bends (squats) with weights, do not go below 90 degrees. I forget why or if this is still the rule. Maybe Jake (Trainer) can help here. If it were my knees that had new adverse symptoms from a routine that I had been doing for years I would seek the advice of a medical doctor with expertise in this area. Then again online advice is free and you know the saying "You get what you pay for".
Regardless I hope that it works out that you are ok.

Offline Admin Al

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Re: The knees
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2013, 11:05:01 AM »
squats & deep knee bends, especially weighted, are really pretty tough on the knees! at 56 you might want to dial it back a bit...
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Offline strandman

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Re: The knees
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2013, 11:14:30 AM »
nico- any previous injuries ??

I think you may be tempting fate with deep bends and weighted squats.

Offline crazyt

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Re: The knees
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2013, 02:14:57 PM »
Excessive repetitive motion, whether at the work place or the gym, is gonna have negative consequences. There is no better excerise for climbing than climbing. Spurt climbers can suffer the consequences by overworking a hard move.
work hard, play harder

Offline ELM

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Re: The knees
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2013, 09:01:10 PM »
Any excercise that you are moving your joint to it's fullest extent with added weight has the potential to be more harmful that without weight. Listen to your body and rest. If the Crossfit routine you do hasn't bothered you before it may not be the cause of your issue. I would avoid deep knee bends with weight for a while and see if the issue goes away. That said Crossfit and similar programs really keep PT's busy with clients! I understand the motivation behind the programs and people really are drawn to them.  I have just seen a pattern of back surgeries that started with Crossfit injury. Some of the excersises and combos they promote are text book examples of the way to injure yourself. One I've had explained to me was a pull up that you do very fast; you let go of the bar once you reach the apex of the pull-up and then grab the bar on the way down and repeat. The person who explained it to me had recently undergone surgery for an elbow issue they attributed to that excercise.
Ed Matt
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Offline hobbsj

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Re: The knees
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2013, 05:57:58 AM »
Some rest and "vitamin I" may be best.  And while elm has a good point, the crossfit may also be the cause if it has come from an overuse injury.  My athletes get this type of thing with a fit that hasn't bothered them for years, but all of a sudden, WHAM!  But he hit it right on the head with it being a fad that has a lot of people attracted but may promote practices that lead to.  And even if its not the exercise routine, still take time off.  You may have something else that initiated the injury/irritation and activities that were normal now aggravate it.  Like mine and Patrick's PF, we did something stupid, got an overuse injury, and now uphill approaches have us wither like 90 year olds.

Offline perswig

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Re: The knees
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2013, 07:00:54 AM »
When you're symptomatic, does it hurt more if you put direct pressure on your patellas ('kneecaps'), pressing them against the end of your femur?  Chondromalacia patella from chronic grinding under load will do this; I got mine training for a Quantico vacation (plus a torn meniscus, dammit).  Most of the time a dull ache, but every once in a while I'd bump my patella against something and get a screaming stab of pain that nearly made me vomit.  Rest (like, REALLY rest), ice, and NSAIDs like hobbsj said, until it's completely gone.


Or you could have Lyme disease.
Hang it up now and take up fly-fishing.



Hope it resolves quickly for ya.
Dale
If it's overhanging, I'm probably off-route.

Offline danf

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Re: The knees
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2013, 01:47:16 PM »
Chondromalacia
I got that diagnosis back in high school from the trainer.  Running cross-country, combined with years of driving a standard transmission did a number on my knees, the left one especially.  They've gotten better, seemed to be worse in my early to mid-twenties than they are now at 34...  I've been driving a standard again for the last 5 years and haven't had too many issues.

I know it can be hard to do at times, but rest is definitely a good thing!

Offline Nico

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Re: The knees
« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2013, 07:26:36 PM »
 My knees don't hurt when I am exercising, even lifting. They feel warmed up and strong. They just get sore from time to time during the day and I wonder why and whether it is a sign I should modify my routine.  I don't want to stop climbing any time soon!
I am a big fan of my gym, I admit - Crossfit Casco Bay in Portland. The trainers are really good and we don't do crazy stuff like someone mentioned. I did a great Katahdin trip in February (that big ski in . . .) and climbed in the Cascades last June with a 65 pound pack with no issues and I credit my gym.
Thanks for the tips. I'll dial it back some, maybe get a consult.

Offline JBrochu

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Re: The knees
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2013, 08:35:19 AM »
and climbed in the Cascades last June with a 65 pound pack

I've discovered your problem.
Have a quiche, now, or maybe a tort.  You deserve it!
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Offline M_Sprague

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Re: The knees
« Reply #11 on: September 21, 2013, 09:11:01 PM »
Superglue. ..Oh wait. Wrong thread.
"Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is not a path and leave a trail."

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Offline lucky luke

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Re: The knees
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2013, 10:09:58 PM »
My knees don't hurt when I am exercising, even lifting. They feel warmed up and strong. They just get sore from time to time during the day and I wonder why and whether it is a sign I should modify my routine.

Tendon are cartilage with very low vascularization. That mean that when you have micro cut in your tendon, it take around three weeks to heal. As you exercise, there are few of the tendon that can be cut and with a repetitive exercise, few make more and when you have to stop to train it is because the injury is important. Be wise, stop before. Take less weight. Ask to have other exercise less intensive.

When a tendon is at rest, there is no water in it. When some one talk about a warm up, it is to stimulate the activity of the tendon and bring water in it. At that moment, the tendon work as a chuck absorber in your car to prevent accident and you won't have any pain. After the exercise, the water go out and the tendon rest. As micro cut occur, sensor will notify it and will cause a reflex to bent the muscle. You will have spasm and you will feel pain. It is a defense mechanism of your organism, a message. As the sensor is at the extremity of the muscle, you don't know exactly where is the cut. When it hill, the wound can create on the tendon an obstruction that will move and create inflammation. It is the chronic stage of a tendinitis.

So warm up at least fifteen minute before doing the exercise and drink as much water as you can and took as less cigarette or other substance that will lower your level of liquid in your tendon

Offline ELM

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Re: The knees
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2013, 06:38:42 PM »
If you every have water in you tendons you are going to rupture them.

Most recent studies have shown that conventional "warming up" stretching actually causes your muscle and connective tissue injury. Except for the glutes. Who knows why.
Ed Matt
" I release my attention: because of you now I am in danger!!! " -Champ

Offline strandman

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Re: The knees
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2013, 09:51:42 AM »
Interesting.. i was just talking with a PT who thinks that movement in certain arthritis situations can cause MORE inflammation !?