NEClimbs.com forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Reading the forum on your cell phone? There's an easier way. We've enabled a Tapatalk app that makes browsing the forum a whole lot easier. Check it out in the iPhone or Android store if you don't own it already.

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Down

Author Topic: Jimmy Dunn  (Read 1619 times)

JBrochu

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1011
  • Doing God's work
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2013, 08:04:38 AM »

Can I suggest we take the tired sport versus trad argument to another thread because I would love to hear some more first-hand accounts of Jimmy Dunn exploits.

I think one of the coolest things about climbing as opposed to more traditional sports / activities is that the normal participants get to play in the same arena as the heroes (or All Stars if you will).

Before I started climbing (mid 90's) I had read tons of books, magazines, and all the local guidebooks and people like Dunn, Tut, Webster, Elms, Barber, Bouchard, etc. seemed like Gods to me. I was lucky enough to meet frik when I first started and one of the first times out at Cannon we ran into Webster and I couldn't believe frik knew him personally and I was having a conversation with the guy. Since then I've met tons of the "old guard" (mostly beer drinking though, I still can't climb for shit) and some of the new guys -- you just don't get to do that in other sports.

 

 

Logged
Have a quiche, now, or maybe a tort.  You deserve it!
-bristolpipe

I like to keep things simple, even if it's faaaken painful and miserable.
-Stoney Middleton

This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.
-Friar Tuck

SA

  • NEClimbs Senior Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 333
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2013, 08:48:34 AM »

Jbeta,

If you examine my original post, I never compared Jimmy Dunn's exploits to any other climber, and I never mentioned climbs in New England. I certainly didn't "put down" modern climbers.

His routes in the West are quite different than anything he did in N.H., and many of his bold, run-out leads were done from the ground-up--on-sight, without the use of cams.

Speaking of New England, when I started mid-60's, Wiessner and J. Turner were my "hero's". Now that I'm old, I don't have anymore "hero's", but I do respect what was done in the past, and also what the new generation of cutting-edge climbers are accomplishing.

Jimmy Dunn is a "legend" out West, far more than in the East, among the veteran climbers, and for good reason. Some of his hard routes in the Black Canyon, have had additional bolts added by really well known strong climbers, simply because they were not bold enough to do them in Jimmy's style.

Again, my original post didn't malign any of the modern climbers of today, and I am impressed by the drive of some of my good friends, who in their mid-50's are working on 5.13 "projects"

I'm sitting here typing this, instead of being productive,  because I tore something in my shoulder yesterday on Cathedral, Sh----it.

« Last Edit: September 26, 2013, 10:20:01 AM by SA »
Logged

strandman

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4473
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2013, 10:31:54 AM »

Any story with Jimmie and Earl Wiggens will get my attention....

and what about george ?  climbing in the  desert in 1956??????????????


Yes , the first solo f/a on ElCap is pretty significant

SA- will you tell the beaver story ?
Logged

Admin Al

  • NEClimbs Administrator
  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6984
  • Climb 'till your forearms turn to jelly!
    • NEClimbs
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #18 on: September 26, 2013, 05:32:29 PM »

I'm sitting here typing this, instead of being productive,  because I tore something in my shoulder yesterday on Cathedral, Sh----it.

well that is a bummer...
Logged
Al Hospers
____________________________________
my music
 https://www.facebook.com/BlackMountainRamblers

web hosting, design and software programming:
 http://www.cambersoft.com

sneoh

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1915
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2013, 11:32:08 PM »

Take care and heal up fast, Steve.
I am nursing a strained and weak shoulder too.  Nothing tore, or at least I do not think so.
Logged

"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

USBRIT

  • NEClimbs Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2014, 03:00:46 PM »

Jbeta,

If you examine my original post, I never compared Jimmy Dunn's exploits to any other climber, and I never mentioned climbs in New England. I certainly didn't "put down" modern climbers.

His routes in the West are quite different than anything he did in N.H., and many of his bold, run-out leads were done from the ground-up--on-sight, without the use of cams.

Speaking of New England, when I started mid-60's, Wiessner and J. Turner were my "hero's". Now that I'm old, I don't have anymore "hero's", but I do respect what was done in the past, and also what the new generation of cutting-edge climbers are accomplishing.

Jimmy Dunn is a "legend" out West, far more than in the East, among the veteran climbers, and for good reason. Some of his hard routes in the Black Canyon, have had additional bolts added by really well known strong climbers, simply because they were not bold enough to do them in Jimmy's style.

Again, my original post didn't malign any of the modern climbers of today, and I am impressed by the drive of some of my good friends, who in their mid-50's are working on 5.13 "projects"

I'm sitting here typing this, instead of being productive,  because I tore something in my shoulder yesterday on Cathedral, Sh----it.
Steve ... You are my young hero....whats productive mean?
Logged

SA

  • NEClimbs Senior Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 333
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2014, 04:46:14 PM »

Hey Paul,

You are my OLD hero, ha, ha.

I'm starting an addition to my garage, in an effort to use up some of my old beams, before they rot, and I croak.
Logged

markvnh

  • NEClimbs Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 178
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2014, 05:09:05 PM »

The first time I got the nerve to lead "They Died Laughing" I literally took a day off from work to climb it mid week so no one would be around. I walk in with my partner and there's a guy doing a lap bare foot! I'm kinda in awe and when he gets back to the ground we start talking and I'm going holy shit I'm gripped thinking about leading it with a rope and shoes. He said you'll have no problems and gave me a few bits of beta. I climbed it clean and then rapped back down and he said "good job, I knew you'd have no problem." Then he introduced himself and said my name is Jimmy Dunn. Only time I met him but it's memorable.
Logged

lucky luke

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 1400
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2014, 09:18:20 PM »

I walk in with my partner and there's a guy doing a lap bare foot! I'm kinda in awe and when he gets back to the ground we start talking and I'm going holy shit I'm gripped thinking about leading it with a rope and shoes.

Working out bare foot...with a rope?  did any body know what was his secret to climb so hard? Doing lap is a very good technique and I didn't see a lot of climber doing that.

Base told me that some of you climb in winter, aid and some times free climbing?
Logged

kenreville

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 440
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2014, 10:51:22 PM »

Somehow, the fact that some skinny punk manages to climb 40' of bolted blankness after weeks of trying just doesn't create the same inspiration.

I never understood how certain climbers of the past have gained almost mythical status, creating a cult-like following. These climbers can do no wrong, and it seems everyone has a story of their exploits. Maybe it's a function of the time and the fact that so many more people are climbing, but New England is filled with a lot of strong climbers these days, many of whom will never be spoken of with the same reverence of the Dunns of the past. Many of these climbers don't have the cult-like following enjoyed by Dunn and others, but their accomplishments are just as impressive, if not more so, than those "greats" you admire. And, here's the worst-kept secret among today's best trad climbers: they all honed their skills clipping bolts.

It's quite simple. When humans see another human do something super human a small population of them will say "fuck man, I can do that." And some of them do. And then push it tad further. So all the modern climbers you speak of have leap frogged on the backs of yesterday's limit pushers,

That's how it works. And if those old timers have a cult following, well shit man, they deserve it.

Jimmy made made the first ascent of Zonked out with one foot barefoot. That kinda stuff is legendary and damn well should be. If you haven't tried it, you should give it a go. From experience, it's a mother trucker.

I'm glad to say I've climbed a day with Jimmy Dunn years ago on Whitehorse. A great person. And a deserved legend.
Logged

strandman

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4473
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #25 on: July 15, 2014, 09:49:49 AM »

many years ago i went out with Jimmie on the Big Stone and then drinking in the Mountain Room Bar..THAT was memorable..I think.

Just looking at Diagonal in the Black makes me ill..2nd ascent one point of aid w/o cams, pins,bolts, second rope  etc in 6 hours.
Logged

lucky luke

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 1400
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2014, 10:09:55 AM »

Somehow, the fact that some skinny punk manages to climb 40' of bolted blankness after weeks of trying just doesn't create the same inspiration.

I never understood how certain climbers of the past have gained almost mythical status, creating a cult-like following. These climbers can do no wrong, and it seems everyone has a story of their exploits. Maybe it's a function of the time and the fact that so many more people are climbing, but New England is filled with a lot of strong climbers these days, many of whom will never be spoken of with the same reverence of the Dunns of the past. Many of these climbers don't have the cult-like following enjoyed by Dunn and others, but their accomplishments are just as impressive, if not more so, than those "greats" you admire. And, here's the worst-kept secret among today's best trad climbers: they all honed their skills clipping bolts.

It's quite simple. When humans see another human do something super human a small population of them will say "fuck man, I can do that." And some of them do. And then push it tad further. So all the modern climbers you speak of have leap frogged on the backs of yesterday's limit pushers,

I will say: before, the protection was pitons and people who climbed couldn't place as good placement than with nuts. They where following crack and used pin as they can, not as they want.  The nuts and new rope bring an other dimension to climbing. It was as you said, the young pushing the older. But they don't just have to climb hard, they have to think at a strategy to place the pro, the chance that he will found a crack or a feature... some very good route was more an epic than a calculate risk. climbing at howl's head cliff with stoppers and you will find yourself doing long run out without any idea of what you are going to find. Because of that situation, the climber over trained stamina, nuts placement, falling, rope management, leadership, etc,which is good.

The transition between nuts and cam bring an other dimension as the scary nuts can be change by a solid cam that it is more trustable. People still have to climb hard and they need more power to secure themselves. It was the era of super hero ,like Dunn. By the end of 85, all the great problem of climbing was done. The only think that left is to find new places where to climb.

We can understand that bolt brought more places to climb, but not better climber. As people retro bolt and work a route, the climber can be weaker and still do hard route because he didn't have to think about where is going to be the next pro...rope drag, forces on the top pieces, how to fall if the top piece pop out, and many other think.

Most climber still looking at what Dunn had made and think that he wouldn't be able to do that in the same condition even if they climb for 25 years. Old climber look at the new generation and think that if they had bolt they had climb at the same level. They still climb close to their level in top rope.

It is why his reputation is so strong. 

 
Logged

strandman

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4473
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #27 on: July 15, 2014, 10:13:49 AM »

All the great problems were done by '85 ?  I respectfully disagree
Logged

kenreville

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 440
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2014, 10:17:43 AM »

Me? I disrespectably disagree.

You are so wrong. 
Logged

strandman

  • NEClimbs God
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4473
Re: Jimmy Dunn
« Reply #29 on: July 15, 2014, 10:33:42 AM »

To try and keep slightly on topic..I got to do the prow with Jimmie around '90 or so, during one of hie short visits, he remembered every move like it was yesterday.SO casual

Tiny rack, some weed and one rope..like always
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.159 seconds with 23 queries.