Author Topic: areas for learning  (Read 1335 times)

Offline strandman

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areas for learning
« on: May 05, 2014, 10:28:59 AM »
what spots taught you the most about climbing ???  a certain area ? route ?

mine was for sure the Quincy Quarries

Offline Pete Jackson

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2014, 11:51:55 AM »
what spots taught you the most about climbing ???  a certain area ? route ?

mine was for sure the Quincy Quarries

I learned to climb at an obscure graffiti-covered TR crag in suburban MD called Ilchester: http://www.mountainproject.com/v/ilchester/106499367 with weekend road trips to Great Falls and Carderock. Mostly those crags gave me the basic movement skills.

I learned to place gear (correctly) at Seneca Rocks, WV in the early 1990s once I had a car to use to get there from Baltimore. 'Prune' taught me about fear of injury. 'Ecstacy' taught me about exposure. 'Old Ladies Route' taught me to pay attention on exposed 5.2s. And climbing the last 25 feet to the South Summit unroped (many many times) taught me a lot about focus at end of the route.

I took a trip to Summersville Lake some time in the mid 1990s, where I clipped my first bolt, which may not have been the same as learning to place nuts at Seneca, but was a pivotal moment in my climbing career nonetheless.
We came to climb, not to whine.

Offline markvnh

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2014, 12:46:23 PM »
When I started climbing my local spot was Pawtuckaway. For sure I learned allot by climbing there and it was a great place to go because you could always find a partner.

Route wise was the first time I climbed Lakeview. I had never been on a multi pitch climb where I was going to have to share leads and had only led a few one pitch routes before. My partner that day had years of experience over me - my second year of rock - but had recently come off an injury that occurred while climbing. We got to the base of the climb and he said "my heads not in it, it's all yours."

I led the whole route and never once felt out of sorts as I was completely focused.

To this day whether climbing rock, ice or mountains - it's always focus on the task at hand. Climbing safe!

Offline neiceclimber

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2014, 08:35:01 AM »
Lower West Bolton then Upper West. Didn't have the cash for cams, just tri-cams, nuts, and far too many hexes. At the time there wasn't any guide book or online info. We'd just wander the hillsides looking for clean rock and start up anything that looked like it would take gear. Got in over our heads far too many times, lost a few times, and bailed on routes almost daily.

Smuggs for ice.

DLottmann

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2014, 09:19:03 AM »
Red Rocks, Cannon, Pawtuckaway, and home sweet home MWV.

Offline Pete Jackson

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2014, 09:41:07 AM »
Didn't have the cash for cams, just tri-cams, nuts, and far too many hexes.

Same here! Couldn't afford cams, so I got a set of tri-cams and developed a certain fondness for their versatility. My wife hates me for owning them, but the pink tricam has saved my ass more than once: I don't climb trad routes without it.
We came to climb, not to whine.

Offline sneoh

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2014, 09:57:42 AM »
In no particular order -
Hammond Pond and Crow Hill, learning to lead, oh so very long ago :(
High Exposure, nice intro to The Gunks,
Green Piece, New River, 1st .10 sport route onsight,
Red Rocks, North Shore, how hard 5.8/5.9 friction is :),
Red River Gorge, in '96, learning to make what were inconceivable moves before the trip,
Romper Room, Sundown, got to believe in one's ability,
Social Outcast, Rumney, personal milestone but learned projecting is not really my thing :),
Red Rocks, NV, humility and what a long day of climbing feels like (totally beaten up!)
« Last Edit: May 06, 2014, 10:04:36 AM by sneoh »

"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

Offline strandman

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2014, 10:16:19 AM »
You still have time for the Black  8)

I think I may have learned more on climbs that i have failed on ??

Offline sneoh

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2014, 10:19:17 AM »
I think I may have learned more on climbs that i have failed on ??
On balance, I feel that lessons through failure serve me better though no way as sweet.

"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

Offline strandman

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2014, 10:22:06 AM »
True indeed.

I'm still pissed that i never did the Squat though.

Offline triguy

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2014, 10:45:23 AM »
Hey Pete, I cut my teeth at Iilchester in the late 80's and early 90's also....I am sure we crossed paths BITD!

Spent a lot of time at Annapolis rocks in Frederick, md also back then. Prob learned more climbing here than anywhere else.

Learned the meaning of managing fear at Seneca.

Learned to not take a mountain for granted on Washington!
Ice has two purposes in life: climbing and watering down bad scotch!

Offline Pete Jackson

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2014, 10:57:48 AM »
Speaking of areas where we learned to climb: I'm planning a short trip back to Great Falls in the near future. Planning to tick a few lines I couldn't do when I was a kid.

http://mountainproject.com/v/lost-arrow/106162636
http://mountainproject.com/v/buckets-of-blood-arete/106335592

The cliffs are only 60 feet high, but they all mostly start in the Potomac River. This is the setting (linked from Mountain Project):



Hey Pete, I cut my teeth at Iilchester in the late 80's and early 90's also....I am sure we crossed paths BITD!

Small world! I climbed with Bob Jachens, Troy (the guy from the marines who showed up in 92-93), and a little bit with John Kelbel. I was the kid just out of high school and just into UMBC who had no idea what he was doing. :-)
We came to climb, not to whine.

Offline JJ Jameson

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2014, 01:12:54 PM »
Learned a lot about slab and face at Quincy.
Developed good strength at Hammond pond.
Learned the most about hard, thin, sequential face climbing at Kenmore Square of all places (the retaining walls for Park Drive) the walls are prolly 10-12 feet tall, granite blocks that have some really thin sharp granite edges. Great for learning hand and foot holds.

Got great endurance by bouldering at the Longmont T stop. It's prolly 150' long, and I would commit to traversing back and forth on it, and played games like not allowing myself to get off of it for 30-45 minutes. Found neat ways to rest, getting no-hands rests etc. served me well in the real world.

Offline kenreville

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2014, 03:22:07 PM »
For me, the ADK's-  Chapel Pond, Beer Walls, Pitchoff Chimney Cliff, Poco and the Web.
A great place to cut one's teeth.

First lead was at Moxham Dome (near Gore Mtn.). Unfortunately I believe the cliff is off limits today.  :'(

Offline Jeff

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Re: areas for learning
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2014, 04:28:03 PM »
After beginnings on the Vercors limestone near Grenoble, France, I spent years of weekend days on CT traprock, at the Gunks, and on Conway granite--14 straight weekends in the spring/summer of 1969 (placing and removing pitons) taught me to appreciate "clean climbing" as it came to be called--I could come home from a weekend away with some skin still on my knuckles. Removing overdriven pitons left a lot of scars!