Author Topic: Pine Mountain  (Read 3624 times)

Offline slacker

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Pine Mountain
« on: October 04, 2014, 10:35:49 am »
This is a very spectacular back county location.  It is a bit of a bushwhack to get to and there is no flagging to keep some adventure!  I'm sure a few people throughout the years have been out there but for the most part it has been left alone for years.  I have found all kind of old pins on the cliff, some dating back to the 30's.  I got in touch with the historian from the AMC down in Boston.  She has been kind enough to look up any documented info on the place.  It turns out that Aug 24, 1934 was the first recorded climbing trip to Pine MT.  The trip was led by Henry (Hank) Childs, a very bold climber of the AMC out of Rhode Island.  Because of this, everything has been climbed ground-up with little to no fixed gear to make sure that we were not treading on old and bold lines.

To get there go to the Dolly Copp rd off of 16.  Drive this to a parking area for hiking Mt Madison across the street from the Horton Center rd.  Hike the road to a hiking trail for Pine Mt on the right.  Hike this trail for a bit and then cut off right into the woods. about 15 to 20 minutes of hiking  will get you to the base.

Aside from the amazing history of the place, there is a lot of great geology here also.  Being a neophite in geology, this is my basic understanding taught to me by a friend who is a college teacher of geology.  From the climbers view the left side of the cliff (headwall) is made up of metamorphic limestone.  There is also what she thought to be an old coral reef!  From there as you head right across the cliff, it turns into a fine grained granite, quite like Cannon or Wheeler Mt.  Then on the far right side, the granite changes over to pegmatite.  This is also a kind of granite but is very mica and quartz based.  It is very wild to look at and climb on!

The routes that we have discovered and put up here are from left to right.

Pope on a rope-  5.7 climbs the slabs past a few bolts and gear right to the base of the headwall, to a 2 bolt ring anchor.  A 60 meter will get you to the tree ledge and from there either hike down or rap back to the base. FA Matt and Kathy Barker

It's a Pinkham thing- 5.8 A great 3 pitch route!!  Pull an overlap at the base and climb up to a stance on the slab.  At this point a pink tri cam is slotted in a perfect pocket.  Now commit to the slab past 4 more more bolts to a big overlap.  Pull throughout this (bolt) to a ring anchor.  The next pitch goes up and right to the large pine tree, all on natural gear pulling many overlaps along the way.  The 3rd pitch is a scramble over some really cool rock.  1 60 will get you back to the ground.  FA Matt Barker and Ben Smith

Old route direct- 5.7  The 1st pitch starts on lowest point of slab. You climb straight up to an overlap (protect here) then climb up and clip a bolt.  From here commit to some great slab climbing passing a couple bolts. Build an anchor 30 feet to the left of the anchor of Contact under and overlap. ( Small cams)  2 more fantastic overlap climbing.  You will need to build an anchor along the way and you will pass 1 pin one the last pitch.  To get off go to a tree anchor above the contact headwall.  2 ropes will get you to the contact ring anchor and then to the ground. FA Ben Smith Matt Barker 1st pitch

The original line I believe starts at the same point. You climb up the slab to the overlap. Now climb way left to a small right facing flake. Clip the old ring pin and commit to some very run our slabbing.  Trending right. The next gear with be in some not so good quality flakes. Pull an overlap and trend right building a natural anchor under an overlap!  Its a fun line to climb but the wondering nature of the line creates horrible rope drag.  FA Hank Childs?

Contact 5.6-  30 feet right of the previous route and slightly up hill you will see a left facing corner.  Climb up the slab corner 30 feet to a giant detached flake trending up and left.  From a stance on the top of the flake look right into the crazy looking rock. You will see a bolt.  Climb up to the bolt threw the headwall just to the right of the fine grained granite. Pull a steep move on a great door knob hold clipping another bolt and the up to the ring anchors.  Next climb straight up on the pegmatite on gear to a comfortable point and build an anchor.  Now up threw the final head wall to a tree anchor.  FA  Matt and Kathy Barker

Hank Chinos- 5.6 this route starts to the right of contact by 15 feet.  It climbs entirely in the pegmatite for 3 pitches. Threw a steep headwall on the first pitch on great gear.  The second pitch gear anchor is near a big loose block so please use caution. The third pitch is threw the same headwall as Contact to the tree anchor. FA Jon Garlough and Hank Tracy.

« Last Edit: October 04, 2014, 10:43:15 am by slacker »

Offline slacker

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2014, 10:38:05 am »
Here are a few Pics. The file size was to big i think.

Offline perswig

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2014, 04:33:17 pm »
Outstanding stuff, slacker.  Look at the size of those overlaps...

Dale
If it's overhanging, I'm probably off-route.

Offline strandman

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2014, 05:34:23 pm »
I biked out there BITD and was rained out twice..never went back,,shit

Offline Admin Al

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2014, 09:43:22 pm »
great stuff guys. I rode my road bike Dolly Copp on Monday. I actually had wondered if you could ride the trail up there.
Al Hospers
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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2014, 08:10:52 am »
My very first rock climb was as a 14 year old camper at Horton Center on Pine Mountain, summer of 1992. A short 40 foot top-rope in sneakers and my life was changed forever. I've only been back once a few years ago to see if I could find the tiny crag they were using BiTD, and just ended up hiking the loop. I'll have to go back to check these routes out soon. Thanks for sharing!

Offline crazyt

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2014, 08:37:10 am »
I remember climbing here in the late 80's. I remember a bunch of fun moderates. Worth the visit.
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Offline old_school

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2014, 07:25:26 am »
Driven by that every day for the past 11 years, knew some stuff had been done up there years ago but wondered if the climbing out there was worth the effort. Looks like it is! Nice work!  :)
"Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them, you will be a mile away from them and you will have their shoes."

Offline frik

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2014, 09:07:33 am »
The Army used to train on that place back int he 60's. Mostly just rappelling and a bit of scrambling.

Offline M_Sprague

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2014, 01:14:51 pm »
Limestone? I didn't realize there was any in NH. Are there any good routes through it, or potential? On GoogleEarth the headwall looks pretty steep, but I can't get a real sense of how tall it is. Nice write-up, Matt
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Offline slacker

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2014, 06:15:47 pm »
Mark,

Like I said i'm know very little about geology but a friend is a college prof.  I do know that over in Crawford notch by the train cut there is  petrified coral.  At first glance the upper headwall looks very impressive.  That is what inspired me to climb Pope on a rope first to get a peak. It is a very cool feature by only 25 feet tall.  bummer...



Matt

Offline strandman

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2014, 09:32:49 am »
Interesting,, I have climbed on a limestone/sandstone mix in Utah,,funky shit that's for sure...kind of a pocket/flake /gritty mixture

Offline Chinos

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2014, 06:56:32 pm »
this is a really fun place!

Offline jlecours

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2014, 12:56:55 pm »
The rock in that last photo reminds me of the ever so popular Wonderland in Rumney.


Offline slacker

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Re: Pine Mountain
« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2014, 06:59:38 am »
It really does look alike,  right down to the ledge on the bottom!    :laugh: