Author Topic: Accidents in the Potrero  (Read 4535 times)

Offline strandman

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2015, 03:17:59 PM »
A nice ,quicky prussik is a wired nut slid through and then looped around the rope..looks spooky, but it works

Offline sneoh

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2015, 05:05:10 PM »
Cutting only one end on a bi-color rope is such a bad idea in so many ways.
I do not use a prussik backup either.  Had to wrap the rope around my leg a few times in the past for this and for that reason.
On steep sport routes we either clean on lower or clean on TR, try to avoid clean on rap for steep sport routes.  Real pain even with a GG like Ward does.

"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

Offline sneoh

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2015, 05:07:36 PM »
A nice ,quicky prussik is a wired nut slid through and then looped around the rope..looks spooky, but it works
Really?  Must say I never heard this before.  I am trying to picture the setup.  Having a  brain cramp. 

"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

Offline eyebolter

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2015, 05:27:45 PM »
In the past I always tied the ropes together in one knot those few times when I put a knot in the end, but Matt Horner pointed out to me that this can really twist the ropes. On the other hand, it helps avoid the fiasco I had on PT a few years ago, when my partner knotted each rope when I normally wouldn't have bothered. Got down to the anchors at the top of P1, it's cold as hell and getting dark, so I immediately start pulling the ropes. Oops. Crappy time to hang your rope. If the ropes had been tied together, wouldn't have happened.

I never use a prussik back up either, though there have been a couple of high stress situations in the Canadian Rockies when I sure wanted one about half way down.

Not sure a prussick backup is all that great IMHO.


You got to get out to Jack's Soon, if you haven't been there.  We were climbing in shorts and no shirts with highs in the 40's.

And a 54 year old who drinks a bottle of wine a night can still onsight 5.12b....at least there.



Offline strandman

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2015, 05:47:36 PM »
A nice ,quicky prussik is a wired nut slid through and then looped around the rope..looks spooky, but it works
Really?  Must say I never heard this before.  I am trying to picture the setup.  Having a  brain cramp.
It's dicey..slide the wire through, loop it around the rope and cinch back through the loop..looks like it will cut the rope, but it never has on me

Yo Ward ..is Jacks still considered "soft" ?

Offline eyebolter

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2015, 06:39:08 PM »
A nice ,quicky prussik is a wired nut slid through and then looped around the rope..looks spooky, but it works
Really?  Must say I never heard this before.  I am trying to picture the setup.  Having a  brain cramp.
It's dicey..slide the wire through, loop it around the rope and cinch back through the loop..looks like it will cut the rope, but it never has on me

Yo Ward ..is Jacks still considered "soft" ?

Yes, Jacks is considered soft.

BUT...

We climbed there 10+ years ago, when Mrs. Eyebolter was climbing hard.   I onsighted like 5 or 6 12a's, never fell once.   Mrs. Eyebolter, who has onsighted 12b, and at the time was redpointing (at least after work) 12a's at pretty much every area we went to, could NOT do all the moves on ANY of the 12a's at Jack's.

Bottom line, if you are a strong boulderer (like me), it will feel soft.   If you are stronger in endurance (like Mrs. Eyebolter) you will get your ass kicked.

 

Offline sneoh

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2015, 07:34:40 PM »
I hear you, Ward. there are a lot of places I still need to go to, incl Potrero.
I suppose Prussik is good if you get knock out or  injured by rock or ice while rapping.  But it would not have prevented these two accidents, I do not believe.


"You have to decide to do a flag, where you can broke your vertebrae or a barn door depending of your pro" - the poster formerly known as Champ

Offline ralbert20

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2015, 07:51:13 PM »
I mostly use the prussick because my 8.5mm doubles feel TINY! Especially when I am now weighing in around 200#...

Offline Admin Al

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2015, 09:14:54 PM »
if I'm using my 10.2 I rarely use a backup, only at the Gunks on those really looong overhangs. but I ALWAYS use one on my 7.5 doubles. even with a Reversino they run pretty quick.
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Offline tradmanclimbz

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2015, 05:59:52 AM »
autoblock on every rap. saved my bacon a few times also makes dealing with a tangle sooo much easier.  alsmost never tie knotts in the ends. only if i have not done the rap before and can't see where i am going. knotts can cause a serious epic.....

Offline Jeff

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #25 on: January 08, 2015, 09:04:56 AM »
Trad-- I have to agree. Since I learned the autoblock and extending the rappel ( prob in early '90s) , I use it on every rappel unless I can clearly see both ends on the ground; that said, in an area with danger of s**t falling from above ( choosy rock, ice climbing, alpine routes) I always use an autoblock-- it's too easy to use and can prevent disaster-- I'm old now and potentially forgetful; I only tie knots on long multi-pitch routes or routes where I can't see the next rap station or don't know where it is; if I do, I knot each rope separately, to avoid the twisting nightmares tying them together can produce.

Offline strandman

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #26 on: January 08, 2015, 09:35:50 AM »
99 % I use a biner brake or sticth plate to rap///I know..but it works and is simple

Jacks looks like the boulder/power type place..but the scorpion in spring must be the most fun..we only have tarantulas near me

Offline JBro

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Re: Accidents in the Potrero
« Reply #27 on: January 08, 2015, 08:33:42 PM »
Trad-- I have to agree. Since I learned the autoblock and extending the rappel ( prob in early '90s) , I use it on every rappel unless I can clearly see both ends on the ground; that said, in an area with danger of s**t falling from above ( choosy rock, ice climbing, alpine routes) I always use an autoblock-- it's too easy to use and can prevent disaster-- I'm old now and potentially forgetful; I only tie knots on long multi-pitch routes or routes where I can't see the next rap station or don't know where it is; if I do, I knot each rope separately, to avoid the twisting nightmares tying them together can produce.

I do about the same.

Even without the advantage of being much easier to control, I find the extended rappel more comfortable.
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