Author Topic: New and looking for answers  (Read 1017 times)

Offline tradmanclimbz

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Re: New and looking for answers
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2004, 12:29:02 am »
Most of those routs feel pretty big when the wind is blowing 100+mph. One time we  went up there  and it was so nasty that we just hiked diagonal, poked our heads over the top and allmost got blown off the hill. downclimbed central and called it a day. I can remember a few times trying to get accross the alpine gardens with wind so intense that  you could hardly stand up. Once in a sleet storm when we got coated in ice a1/4 in. thick. pretty cool place. The last time I ws up there the wind was gusting to 157mph. On a calm day it is a walk in the park and easy to forget how nasty it can get 8) I suppose if you are used to really big mountains that the weather up there might seem pretty tame? I have never been on anything bigger than the tetons and that was summer with perfect weather every time so Mt washington in winter still impresses me.

Offline Justus

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Re: New and looking for answers
« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2004, 12:16:54 pm »
Thanks everyone! I'm really looking forward to winter here suddenly instead of planning on just some moderate hikes and gym workouts.

The guide you mentioned: an ice climber's guide to northern new england--is that the one, hope so, i ordered it.


thanks again for all of the advice,


Justus

Offline Woody48

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Re: New and looking for answers
« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2004, 04:37:18 pm »
I liked Shoestring Gully as an alpine style route.  It can be done with an alpine ice axe.  I have two seasons of ice under my belt, so I still consider myself a rookie.  Last winter I focused on vertical ice technique and leading on moderate climbs.  Good Luck!
Woody

Offline DWarriner

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Re: New and looking for answers
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2004, 09:38:42 am »
Quote
I've done washington and lafayette in the winter and i'm planning on doing katahdin this year.
Justus



RE: Katahdin

Hi Justus,

Before I can you give you accurate answers, I need to know some more information:

How long are you planning on staying in The Park and what routes are you planning?  How long are you planning for getting from your car to Chimney Pond and back?

Have you made your arrangements for this?  Getting a qualified team of 4 ready and filling out all the paperwork takes longer than you'd think.  

-David
There are no stupid questions - only stupid answers.

Offline Justus

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Re: New and looking for answers
« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2004, 09:07:57 am »
one more noob question:


I'm really interested in leading ice as soon as possible. I lead rock and i've led easy glacier/crevasse fields (i love it at the sharp end) how many screws/pickets would i need to get started on easier stuff like willeys or stuff in huntington?  Is it way too ambitious to have a goal of leading a number of WI/NEI 3s? I've top roped before, it wouldn't be completely a new thing but still...


PS i think i've bagged the idea of katahdin. I didn't realize the plethora of winter routes right here in the whites. Now i have the guide i've become much more informed.



Justus

Offline tradmanclimbz

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Re: New and looking for answers
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2004, 08:09:12 pm »
If you are young and strong there are few reasons that you couldn't lead grade 3 ice pretty quick. If you can find a mentor that is best. follow and learn . Also practice placeing screws on short steep boulder problems. If you can hang on verticle ice 5 feet off the deck (snowbank for a crashpad) and place screws you should have no problem with the stances that most grade 3 climbs offer for gear placement. you don't need snow pickets in the east.  To totaly over protect a long grade 3 climb 11 screws does the job. 3 for the belay, 5 for the pitch and 3 more for the next belay.This gives you pleanty of extra screws for harder single pitch climbs or 2 pitch climbs were you only make one screw belay. Idealy you would not place 5 screws on a grade 3 pitch but it's allways nice to have extra.