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General => General Climbing => Topic started by: Gunkswest on January 03, 2010, 09:56:37 am

Title: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Gunkswest on January 03, 2010, 09:56:37 am
I am working on a new climbing guidebook to southern New Hampshire. The guide will include rock and ice climbs. See below for updates.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: bag11s on January 03, 2010, 12:13:54 pm
How about Durrell Mtn., Goffstown?
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: strandman on January 03, 2010, 01:12:49 pm
AH ! - early summer, just in time for peak bugs.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Admin Al on January 03, 2010, 04:20:47 pm
great Todd, glad to hear it. should you put in Joe English? I thought that was off limits.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: alclimbup2 on January 03, 2010, 04:55:40 pm
As a so. nh climber, most exciting, yes thanx todd and wondered what mr. swain has been up to?, I am a friend of Base, he has has old stories of you rating some of the first climbs in pawtuckaway a few years ago

bags: durrell mtn. is this aka rattlesnake mtn or dunbarton crag?, mostly sport routes 5.9 up except for one 5.7?, yes should be included todd

liked to have thought i knew most local s. nh places but a couple of those I never heard of, todd, i have at least 2 ice climbing areas not in your list i will email you about

yes too bad, at least 3 of those places listed are off limits as far as i know and well...(no further comment)

i learned to climb on joe english, had a friend in military who actually got us "in" with official permission one day this past summer  and we climbed all day, was great, first time in 7 or 8 years there, then went again the next weekend and they(joe english sits on air force sattelite tracking station) said it was a mistake letting us in previous weekend and despite calls to the base commander from my friend, it was no go, so we gave up but for historical value, i'd love to see the climbs and ratings there I know by word of mouth 

anyway, exciting news on a wintery so. nh sunday , good luck 
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: adamiata on January 03, 2010, 07:27:31 pm
I thought Stonehouse was reopened, or soon to be.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: alpinetraveler on January 04, 2010, 10:09:14 pm
Great to hear a new guide is in the works. I cut my teeth on these crags with a worn out, green-covered guide of Todd's as a bible.  I can't give away all the secrets but there a few others that could make the list. Purgatory Falls and Pulpit Rock are both fun ice/mixed spots that are part of town-owned land preserves.  Sensitivity to site aesthetics and interactions with nonclimbers is key but to date it hasn't been a problem that I know of. Both have fun climbing at different grades though neither is known for its height.  Nonetheless they're very cool features on public land.

Justin Preisendorfer
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Admin Al on January 05, 2010, 09:06:44 am
very cool looking cliff at Stonehouse Pond. not sure TPL is amenable to climbers tho...
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: strandman on January 05, 2010, 12:09:32 pm
 :D AH tes - Marlowe. I have some stuff somewhere, the old Duval notes.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: perswig on January 05, 2010, 12:16:20 pm
http://supertopo.com/climbers-forum/783245/Old_NH_Guidebooks

Didn't know how many of you frequent ST, but Basilisk over there has linked many old guides for these areas.  Useful or nostalgia, it's a nice collection.

Dale

(Edit:  holy crap, when did I become a 'Senior member'; hopefully this doesn't imply some sort of competence?)
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: bag11s on January 05, 2010, 03:38:41 pm
Sorry to confuse-

Durell Mtn. is a set of 5 or 6 small crags located in a wooded valley on the town line between Gilford and Gilmanton on the western edge of the Belknap Range. There are quite a few bolted sport climbs of all grades including some that are pretty difficult and some of quite good quality. I believe the land is privately owned- if not in its entirety, then at least partially. I do not know the development history, but have enjoyed climbing there a half dozen times. My apologies in advance if I am encroaching on some sensitive access issue.

Goffstown is an entirely different area, it is a beautiful compact white conglomerate cliff in an open forest setting, pretty much plumb along its entire length, the climbing is real technical with top rope problems and some bolted lines. I heard that Base was involved in its development. It probably has another name.

So- I don't know much about these two fun areas, but have climbed there and would like to know more about the history, access, and ratings.

Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: slink on January 05, 2010, 04:14:34 pm
 What about the place over in Swanzey NH I climbed there a few times years ago.Not sure what I was climbing but there were a few good cracks.
 Jim
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: M_Sprague on January 05, 2010, 04:47:04 pm
Durrel has some great climbs. There was some activity in the past by locals who weren't too experienced putting up routes (nasty bizarre anchors etc), then , a few years ago, David Quinn and his then GF and Brady Libby developed it some more, with some fine sport and mixed routes up to 5.12 and possibly a 13. Ward and Chris Smith and I also put up a few routes too.  When we were putting up routes the access seemed fine, but since, there has been some housing developement and no traspassing signs along where we used to park, so access would have to be reassertained. The rock is somewhat similar to Rumney. One of the lower crags is very steep with corners and aretes. The main cliff has some great routes. I put up a 12c called Fat and Happy near the right side of the main face and there is another 12 to the left of it, that i think Dave got the first assent of. One or 2 over left is a 5.11  by Brady that rivals the length and quality of Black Mamba at Rumney. Then a couple interesting 10s and a short steep project I started to bolt. I'm not sure if anybody finished it. The other walls have some interesting faces and corners mostly put up by the original developers and Dave Quinn and Co. Some of the old routes were cleaned and retroed some with permission.

For more information, I would look up Brady Libby, as he lives near the area and knows the history. It is a good little area with some sweet lines on a nice south facing hillside. It would be very worth figuring out and securing access. The only blight I noticed were a few drinking, atv riding, tree shooting locals who would occasionally roar up, run around and face plant onto stumps. Once you go up the hill a bit that seemed to thin out, though we did haul out a bunch of bags of trash out from below the main cliff.

This is a good area that, last i saw, still had potential for more new routes
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: strandman on January 05, 2010, 06:49:22 pm
What about the place over in Swanzey NH I climbed there a few times years ago.Not sure what I was climbing but there were a few good cracks.
 Jim
Hewe's Hill ? It also had a short nasty roof ?
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: alclimbup2 on January 05, 2010, 07:44:59 pm
thanx for clarification bags,no problemo

the goffstown cliff i first heard of as dunbarton crag and then later rattlesnake mtn (not a mtn.) yes base and pal put up the first climbs , i'll ask him next time i see him what he calls it, now there are new harder 5.12 and harder climbs on overhanging leftside (met fella involved w/that once, can't remember name), too much for me! but way interesting unique rock in that left section and yes beautiful white quartzy climbs elsewhere nice 5.9s and 5.10s, short but sweet, far as i know is still legal to climb there, no no tresspasing signs i saw there last time out this past summer

have a homemade printout guide to hewes hill and still never been there, is only 15 minutes more to franconia notch then keene but i should check it out someday
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: alclimbup2 on January 05, 2010, 07:47:07 pm
also deers leap (not your vt. cliff tradman) in pelham or windham NH, has a few restrictions but a few nice climbs, some right on the water
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Jack_Dorsey on January 07, 2010, 09:23:06 pm
This fall I went into the climbing area called "Durrell Mountain". To get there you take Durrell Mountain Road off of route 107 south of Laconia. As you drive in an easterly direction to the parking spot Durrell Mountain is on your right but not the climbing. The climbing area is on your left. It is on the south side of Whiteface Mountain.

If you follow the hiking trail that goes up Whiteface, the climbing areas will be on your right. This fall the entrances to the climbing areas were obvious. Equally obvious were the no trespassing signs at the start of the hiking trail. I bushwhacked around the marked area to meet the trail part way up the mountain. I've included a portion of the topo that I used to find my way in.

It would be good to get more information about the access issues and routes at this area. It was impressive.

Jack
Title: Goffstown cliffs
Post by: Rocket J. on January 08, 2010, 02:06:15 pm
Are the Goffstown cliffs in area #3 on this map?
http://www.snhpc.org/pdf/Goffstown%202004%20LRPP.pdf

I wonder because I grew up within easy walking distance of this steep area of rock.
There was a boulder up there with a frog painted on it by the Hippies (yes, this was the 70's) and it was called Tipping Rock.  (I think there is another Tipping Rock across town on one of the Uncanoonac moutains...). 

We had some very nice glacial boulders in the woods of our back yard. 
Lots of fun, we had a cave formation suitable for stemming.
Of course, I did not know climbing was actually a SPORT  ::)







Title: Re: Goffstown Cliffs
Post by: alclimbup2 on January 08, 2010, 05:52:36 pm
Rocket J. : it took a while with wife's help looking at that map but no, section 3 not the small sport crag in goffstown/dunbarton, would be more to the right of section 16, the crag is in woods after open power line area that runs along tibbetts hill road
 
is that tipping rock 20 feet or higher?, might have to go see that, I live in Dunbarton, my wife grew up in Goffstown 
 
Title: Re: Goffstown Cliffs
Post by: Rocket J. on January 09, 2010, 09:13:20 am

is that tipping rock 20 feet or higher?, might have to go see that, I live in Dunbarton, my wife grew up in Goffstown 
 

No, it is not, it is bigger than a small child but small enough so that a group of kids could with some effort send it down the ledge, although we did not!  I believe it used to belong to the Hambleton family, but then LaMontagne bought a chunk of property at the top of Summer St. where the bend is.  The access to the rock is now the driveway/private road (?) that extends to the LEFT at the top of Summer St.  I'm asuming that the pair of vicious dogs are long gone! Then the path winds to the right, there used to be a wide expanse of bull pasture there (with a bull, different story!!!) on the far end of that is the ledge with the rock.  It's likely the paint is faded, but who knows, someone might have kept up with it. 

The boulders in my former back yard which is between Summer St. and High St., however, are appx 20 feet tall, the size of small houses/cottages and good rock, the size of some of the boulders at Pawtuckaway, seems like the same type of rock too.

What decade does your wife claim?  I wonder if we knew each other.  I had many friends in Dunbarton growing up as well as some who lived over in the area behind the high school up on Wallace Road in the mountain area.

Besides the bouldering, there is decent cycling there too, I would cover 50 miles a day at least between New Boston, Parker Station, Weare, Grassmere, Dunbarton...I had a lot of energy to burn. 
Title: Re: Goffstown Cliffs
Post by: Admin Al on January 09, 2010, 10:25:29 am
I had a lot of energy to burn. 

love it... that was exactly the way I was as a kid. I used to ride my single speed Huffy from Jacksonville down to Jax Beach on the weekends. it must be 30 miles round trip. definitely burned off the energy for me. kids spend too much time in front of the TV these days.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: strandman on January 09, 2010, 11:06:20 am
 ;D Al, now it would be a 27 speed Puffy !
Title: Re: Goffstown Cliffs
Post by: Rocket J. on January 09, 2010, 11:20:07 am
that was exactly the way I was as a kid

Sadly, I am still that way.  Being a grownup has its downside.
I have to go to the gym every day right after the school bus leaves with the kids, so I can sit still to work.
Otherwise I am too antsy. Where is the pedal-powered computer when you need it?
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Admin Al on January 09, 2010, 02:10:09 pm
I totally understand... anyone who knows me knows how much energy I have, some of which is even occasionally focused. if I don't XC ski or ride the bike every day I really cannot sit still for long.  :P
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: oldmansmith on January 09, 2010, 07:54:00 pm
What about the place over in Swanzey NH I climbed there a few times years ago.Not sure what I was climbing but there were a few good cracks.
 Jim

Yes, Hewes hill it is.  A good Trad area up to 80' tall. I have a copy of an old guide if you need info Todd, e-mail me at wardandpaula@yahoo.com

 
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: frik on January 14, 2010, 01:01:33 pm
Hey Todd,

The "columns" in Greenville sounds like the area set up on an old RR bridge abutment and not an actual cliff... but i've been wrong before.

From what people are saying  about "the Goffstown crag" it confirms what i thought it was. These are not exact
directions, but close enough. From Manchester head west to Goffstown  on the "Goffstown Back road". Take a right onto Tibbuts hill road and follow that  until you hit black brook road. Now turn around and head back down tibbuts hill
taking the first right which should be a cul de sak. Park there and head south along the power lines. after a few hundred yards head right into the woods along a slight rise. The cliff is not hard to find and is below the trail, facing south and west.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: JBro on January 14, 2010, 01:20:43 pm
I believe most of the climbs on those RR trestle's in Greenville were set up by the guy that used to own the rock gym out in that general area. I believe the gym was called Yag's Crag or something like that. If someone know's who I'm talking about and can contact that guy I think he would know the history.

I lived in Greenville for 1.5 years back around 95/96 and the climbs were already there - although I think they were fairly new. The police were already stopping people from climbing on them.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: steve weitzler on January 14, 2010, 01:25:37 pm
There was a photocopied guide to Greenville that I believe might have been done by the fellow that owned Yags, I think his name might have been Dave Quinn. I have a copy of it lying around somewhere. I remember going there once or twice in the middle to late eighties. I will see if I can find it. If anyone wants one I can copy it and get it to you.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: pjs on February 08, 2010, 10:32:18 am
It was Dave Quinn who put up the most of the routes on the greenville trestles. There are about a dozen routes in the 5.8 to 5.12 range, great climbs but the local authorities do patrol the area and escort you of the property. If we are going to throw manmade objects in the mix the stone arch bridge in Keene has a long climbing history and is climbing friendly, again it sports about a dozen routes and has a spectacular aid route up the middle of the grand arch over the Branch river put up back in the day by the FPC outing club. As far as info on the cheese cut all the new sport routes have been put up by Geoge and Bob from Gilsum.
Cheers
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: strandman on April 04, 2010, 10:43:54 am
Hey Todd- I would check with Al Rubin for Monadnock, he is on ST. Swanzey was the Saball's ? with base ? I'll send some info on marlowe though i can't find the duval guide.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: docn on May 08, 2010, 11:49:18 pm
 Hey! I live in Henniker but am currently in Afghanistan ( not climbing!). There is a place in the Minks called, "Devils Den". Hard to explain right now. There don't seem to be any routes established there..maybe toprope. I have cleaned a few routes near Rte. 114 that arent worth mentioning unless you happen to have a flat tire along the road!
 There are also a few bolted routes in Newbury, to the left just as you reach town center from the south on 103. Wish I could help more!
 Oh yeah..also some small cliffs near Shaker Hill Road in Henniker. Good luck with the guide. Climbed at marlowe but have no real info.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: meclimber on October 01, 2010, 08:22:08 am
The temple thing at the ski area isn't worth mentioning. 
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: pjs on February 21, 2011, 02:58:52 pm
I agree the slab at the old ski area is just a place the yaggs staff would bring beginners to get a feel for real rock there really isn't even one climb to speak of. The sport routes out in the woods off Burton Peak (right in the same area) are worth mentioning there are about a dozen routes scattered in the woods on individual outcroppings from 5.7 to 5.12 again these were all put in by Dave Quinn and company.
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Admin Al on November 28, 2011, 08:35:09 pm
who woulda thunk?
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: eyebolter on November 29, 2011, 08:34:46 pm
who woulda thunk?

You think the only crags in New England are in North Corrnflakes?
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: strandman on November 30, 2011, 09:24:03 am
It will be interesting to see this work. It's been 20+ years since the Sabal's initial guide
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Admin Al on November 30, 2011, 04:16:50 pm
who woulda thunk?

You think the only crags in New England are in North Corrnflakes?

not at all, but that's a big hunk of a book...
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: eyebolter on November 30, 2011, 04:55:59 pm
who woulda thunk?

You think the only crags in New England are in North Corrnflakes?

not at all, but that's a big hunk of a book...

You need to get around....
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Admin Al on November 30, 2011, 10:33:37 pm
You need to get around....

my wife says the same thing...
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: nuts on November 30, 2011, 11:01:46 pm
Has anyone climbed at the areas near New Durham?  There are about 140 routes listed on Mountain Project and some of the pics look pretty good.  How good is the rock? 

http://mountainproject.com/v/new-durham-area/107145595

yes.  awesome!
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: frik on December 02, 2011, 09:54:52 am
Todd: looking at the list....no Rock Rimmon?
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: ccclimber on December 03, 2011, 03:28:13 pm
hey pjs
i live in new ipswich...can you tell me where the "burton peak" climbs are?...are you referring to what's know as white ledges?...send me a pm if you can...don't rock climb that much anymore, but might!...much appreciation...ed
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Gunkswest on December 13, 2012, 07:23:04 pm
The current plan is for the ice guide to come out first; followed by the rock guide.

As mentioned before, the idea is to include EVERY venue, whether climbing is currently allowed or not. That way there's a historical record of what's been done and, as access issues change (like Hewes Hill and Stonehouse Pond [now open]), there's info available. As John mentioned, guides to southern NH have been few and far between (the last Saball/Base guides to Pawtuckaway and Rock Rimmon were 1995/1996), so the idea is to include absolutely everything so people have something that is at least complete as of the time of publication. Tracking all of this info down isn't an easy task and requires the climbing community to share information if it wants to have a complete guidebook...

Here's the current list of ICE CLIMBING venues that I know of. Some of the areas are currently off limits, some are small, some rarely form (see paragraph above for the reason why they are on the list). I am sure I am missing some areas and would very much like to hear about them. I need a few more ice flow pictures (hopefully this will be a better winter than last) and then it's ready to go.

Allen Mine (Alstead)
Alstead Ice Flow (Alstead)
Bald Mountain (Newport)
Chandler Mills Hill (Kellyville)
Cheese Cut (Swanzey)
Claremont Railroad Cut (Claremont)
Concord Quarries (Concord)
Deer Leap (Windham)
Devilís Den (New Durham)
Dog Kennel (Enfield)
Dumplingtown Hill (Raymond)
Fall Mountain (North Walpole)
Hewes Hill (Swanzey)
Holt's Ledge (Lyme)
Interstate 89 Ice Flows (near Springfield)
Interstate 93 Ice Flows (Manchester)
Joe English Hill (New Boston)
Keene/Westmoreland Railroad Cut (Keene)
Lake Massasecum Lake Road Cut (near Newbury)
Milford Quarry (Milford)
Milton Road Cut (Milton)
Newfound Lake (Bristol)
Pack Monadnock (Peterborough)
Pawtuckaway State Park (Nottingham)
Piscataquog State Forest (Weare)
Pleasant Valley (near Wolfeboro)
Pulpit Rock (Bedford)
Purgatory Falls (Mont Vernon)
Ossipee Road Cut (Ossipee)
Sandy Pond (near Richmond)
Stonehouse Pond (Barrington)
Sunapee/Newbury Railroad Cut (Newbury)
Surry Mountain Park (Surry)
Tower Quarry (Manchester)
Wellington Business Park (Auburn)
Whiteface (Gilford)
Windsor Ward Mountain (Henniker)
Yuhas Mines (Acworth)

If you know of other areas (big or small), please let me know ASAP.


I'm still looking for:

1) Historical Ice Photos (1960s-80s)

2) Action Ice Photos (Pawtuckaway, Stonehouse, Claremont RR Cut, Dog Kennel, et al)

3) Ice Route Info on the Claremont RR Cut (FA, route name, ratings, photos)

thanks!
 
swain@schat.net
Title: Re: Southern New Hampshire Guidebook in the works
Post by: Admin Al on December 13, 2012, 08:49:07 pm
Wow that sounds really coo Todd. Looking forward to it.