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General => Beginners Area => Topic started by: DWT on October 23, 2011, 05:56:48 pm

Title: History
Post by: DWT on October 23, 2011, 05:56:48 pm
I interested in reading about climbing history.  Can you recommend a good book or two?  Pioneers, influential climbers, technological advances, Golden age,  "The 60's, 70's, 80's,  stuff like that.
Title: Re: History
Post by: strandman on October 23, 2011, 06:11:19 pm
I would say for NE,, the Paul Ross guidebook from'78 and any of the Webster guides.  Various articles in the mags ( many by Ed) as well.  So much of the area is covered by word of mouth.

For other areas;

Climb ! a pretty good history of Colo climbing , up to '80 or so

Vertical World of yosemite, dated but still pretty cool

Title: Re: History
Post by: Jeff on October 23, 2011, 06:27:55 pm
Also for NE--Yankee Rock & Ice by Guy and Laura Waterman covers much of the history of climbing in the north east up to the date of publication (1993)
Title: Re: History
Post by: eyebolter on October 23, 2011, 07:58:43 pm
And you can get a lot of the real history by talking to the old codgers....

Remember, the winners write history.
Title: Re: History
Post by: tradmanclimbz on October 23, 2011, 08:00:41 pm
The White Spider.
Title: Re: History
Post by: strandman on October 24, 2011, 09:12:30 am
And you can get a lot of the real history by talking to the old codgers....

Remember, the winners write history.

Old being a relative term.............
Title: Re: History
Post by: JBro on October 24, 2011, 09:48:52 am
Quote
American Rock, Don Mellor

Quote
Yankee Rock & Ice, Guy and Laura Waterman


I would add to those two Camp 4 by Roper (I think) if you're interested in the history of Yosemite.
Title: Re: History
Post by: steve weitzler on October 24, 2011, 12:30:58 pm
Chris Jones' History of Climbing in North America.
Title: Re: History
Post by: JBro on October 24, 2011, 02:28:50 pm
Chris Jones' History of Climbing in North America.

Oh yeah that's a good one too.

Title: Re: History
Post by: Admin Al on October 24, 2011, 07:35:06 pm
Chris Jones' History of Climbing in North America.

doubled...
Title: Re: History
Post by: strandman on October 24, 2011, 08:21:43 pm
The best history of  NE climbing is Al Rubin-- he's way older than me. Also Paul Ross

check out jimmiDunn's website
Title: Re: History
Post by: steve weitzler on October 25, 2011, 07:35:45 am
John Strand's History of Bar Stool Mountain.
Title: Re: History
Post by: strandman on October 25, 2011, 11:08:39 am
HA ! With you sitting next to me
Title: Re: History
Post by: steve weitzler on October 25, 2011, 12:52:08 pm
Included must be how we fell off Bar Stool Mountain!!! ???
Title: Re: History
Post by: DukeManjunk on January 19, 2012, 10:59:46 pm
for my birthday this year my brother bought me a book called the villian, it was a biography about Don Whillians. it was a good read and i managed to finish it in a weekend while taking breaks patrolling trails in the kinsman pond/franconia ridge/garfield ridge post Irene looking for/clearing storm damage.
Title: Re: History
Post by: strandman on January 20, 2012, 06:10:49 pm
A brilliant climber who turned out to be a real fuck
Title: Re: History
Post by: DukeManjunk on January 21, 2012, 11:29:10 am
if i learned anything from reading the book its that the key to being a successful climber is to stand 5'3" tall and have a 44 inch waistline and the ability to down a bottle of scotch in one gulp.
Title: Re: History
Post by: lucky luke on January 23, 2012, 11:17:44 am
There is some book in french: Sausure, Balmat who climb mt blanc in France. first women team in nepal in the fifty and all the other ascent like the eiger. In that story, you will have the distinction about fontainebleau and alps which is the difference between trad and sport. How climbing was brought to us and it's development on the influence of the alpine technology. After I think it is yosemite valley in the 70 who was the most important even in climbing. and the story most go on.

Some climber said that today, most of the big chalenge was done and only few very train professional still can improve the climbing level.
Title: Re: History
Post by: DLottmann on January 23, 2012, 07:02:06 pm
...which is the difference between trad and sport...

OK, now the truce starts :)
Title: Re: History
Post by: strandman on January 23, 2012, 07:27:10 pm
Fuck the Truce
Title: Re: History
Post by: lucky luke on January 23, 2012, 09:58:19 pm
Fuck the Truce
History is not a truce. Many climber of the city of paris went to climb and they didn't have mountain. They find fontainebleau and begin to train there technique. A climber who take a course in the summer and train all the winter was in better shape than a guide who wait for summer to climb.

There is a movie on that. It is the first ascent of the cerro torre. It is a kind of competition between old style and new style. In the film, there is also a third person. He always talk about a broken ice axe. New style, associate with competition and sport have two mortal accident, the old style climber give up for two years and climb the cerro torre. He find a broken ice axe at the summit, left by the third climber.

So, keep climbing! 
Title: Re: History
Post by: frik on January 24, 2012, 10:38:31 am
Oh Magoo, you've done it again!

Title: Re: History
Post by: JBro on January 24, 2012, 12:33:26 pm
(http://livingliberally.org/files/images/magoo.jpg)
Title: Re: History
Post by: DukeManjunk on January 24, 2012, 01:41:41 pm
just started reading "The Burgess book of lies" by Adrian and Alan Burgess.....i'll let ya know how much i liked it when i finish it.