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 1 
 on: Yesterday at 10:25:44 PM 
Started by lucky luke - Last post by sneoh
Luke, by "ANYTHING" I meant ANY ROUTE, not any pro in particular.  Sorry if you were confused by the language.
I have said my piece.  Al gave me "+++" so I am done with this.  Please carry on as you like.  Feel free to express your opinions.

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 09:59:50 PM 
Started by lucky luke - Last post by lucky luke

First of all, this topic is in "Beginner's Area".  So why are we even talking about The Nose and Regular NW Face of Half Dome?  Better to keep to the target and say things which are immediately relevant and useful.
So here are my personal itemized recommendations to Beginners for strategy -
1.  There is no shame in backing off ANYTHING.  We have ALL BEEN THERE.  Do not get hurt, physically or to the psyche.  Live to fight another day,....

Knowing that there is more than one strategy and more than a way to climb a route is use full for a beginner who just think to "follow the pro". There is a lot of strategy that beginner try that will save there life after.

What is a strategy?

Maybe it is the first question that a beginner should ask for themselves and which kind of strategy that he like to use.  One can learn technique first and safety after climbing on bolt or other will like to learn safety first and how to climb a route after.

As for your suggestion.  "Backing off any thing" is not a strategy...it is a skill that you develop when you want to develop with time. In general, a bolt is safe...when you climb on a cam, it is not as safe as with a bolt...when it is a stopper...you froze and want many of them... so psychologically, if the stopper is not as solid as a bolt...you are in danger. If you begin to learn on stopper, you will acquire the skill to be safe, with cam and stopper, you will be safer. Psychologically, you are going to be more confident when you begin to climb on stopper than when some on begin to climb on bolt (of course, we should keep the variability of each individual and his ego).

In fact, you need to back your nuts when you didn't have confidence in your protection. I wrote a topic on the subject (evolution of the protection). Knowing the limit of your rack is as important as knowing the dimension of your car. The majority of the suggestion of sneoh is general assumption. I can make a mistake, but there is nothing that will help to make a strategy by your own.

It is like travelling. You can buy a trip all organize or you can choose and decide where you are going and what you like to see. Trad is more like a road trip and... if you like that...you need to understand what is a strategy.

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 08:57:37 PM 
Started by danf - Last post by kenreville
All the best Dan. Live on dude.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 08:56:29 PM 
Started by lucky luke - Last post by Admin Al
I should know better than to feed the beast but after two glasses of wine, I can't help myself  ;)
First of all, this topic is in "Beginner's Area".  So why are we even talking about The Nose and Regular NW Face of Half Dome?  Better to keep to the target and say things which are immediately relevant and useful.
So here are my personal itemized recommendations to Beginners for strategy -
1.  There is no shame in backing off ANYTHING.  We have ALL BEEN THERE.  Do not get hurt, physically or to the psyche.  Live to fight another day,
2.  Start off by placing pro from good stances or where you are comfortable while fiddling with gear, etc.  This almost always mean climbing G rated routes for a while (a few years?),
3.  See if you can latch onto the age-old concept of "apprenticeship" and learn tools of the trade and tricks of the trade from more experienced and level-headed climbers,
4.  Don't rush it, grade wise or protected rating wise.  Enjoy the movement over rock and the tactic of figuring out the moves, the gear, and the rests, both before you start and while you are 60, 70, 80 feet above the ground/belay.  Above all, enjoy yourself by going at your own pace and do not let naysayers like LL/Champ scare you into thinking you are going to get into serious trouble if you do not cling on to every word he writes.  I guess it is miraculous that most of us climbed traditionally protected routes for years and never got hurt before LL/Champ came along lecturing us about safety.

"Grid bolted (regularly spaced)" sport routes went out with the 1990's, LL. More contemporary bolting makes the routes (mostly) safe but not sterile.  Over time, people learn, evolve, and do better.  Amen.


+++

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 08:55:12 PM 
Started by ecobot - Last post by Admin Al
Alan Catabriga climbed some dribbles on Hillman's in Tucks. I would seriously doubt that it's been consistently cold enough to form the Dike. it's cold right now, but it's supposed to warm un by Monday. I agree that it will be interesting to see.

that said, whatever there may be to climb sure ain't going to be climbed by us "normals"

;-/

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 08:50:22 PM 
Started by danf - Last post by Admin Al
good news Dan.

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 08:29:20 PM 
Started by danf - Last post by sneoh
Hey, Dan, that was a relief to learn and hear, right?
Keep your spirits up, man.  All the best to you and your family!

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 08:26:14 PM 
Started by danf - Last post by danf
Things happened quickly yesterday after I called the cardiologist and told them that my insurance rolled over at the end of the week. :D

Ended up going in for an echo and an chest x-ray.  Saw the cardio and she also pulled an EKG on me too.  From what I saw on the echo, it looked like my pericardium might have a bit of inflammation, but there was no fluid.  I didn't see the films, but she did say the EKG wasn't showing any signs of pericarditis. 

At this point I'm back on ibuprofen for at least 2 weeks and colchicine for the long term, more than likely.  I will see her again right before Thanksgiving and we'll go from there.

I was happy to hear that she didn't think there was any specific food(s) that could contribute to chest inflammation.  I'm cutting back on the beer for a while (not that I drank a lot anyway), but I was concerned she'd tell me that I might have to quit it for good!

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 08:23:52 PM 
Started by lucky luke - Last post by sneoh
I should know better than to feed the beast but after two glasses of wine, I can't help myself  ;)
First of all, this topic is in "Beginner's Area".  So why are we even talking about The Nose and Regular NW Face of Half Dome?  Better to keep to the target and say things which are immediately relevant and useful.
So here are my personal itemized recommendations to Beginners for strategy -
1.  There is no shame in backing off ANYTHING.  We have ALL BEEN THERE.  Do not get hurt, physically or to the psyche.  Live to fight another day,
2.  Start off by placing pro from good stances or where you are comfortable while fiddling with gear, etc.  This almost always mean climbing G rated routes for a while (a few years?),
3.  See if you can latch onto the age-old concept of "apprenticeship" and learn tools of the trade and tricks of the trade from more experienced and level-headed climbers,
4.  Don't rush it, grade wise or protected rating wise.  Enjoy the movement over rock and the tactic of figuring out the moves, the gear, and the rests, both before you start and while you are 60, 70, 80 feet above the ground/belay.  Above all, enjoy yourself by going at your own pace and do not let naysayers like LL/Champ scare you into thinking you are going to get into serious trouble if you do not cling on to every word he writes.  I guess it is miraculous that most of us climbed traditionally protected routes for years and never got hurt before LL/Champ came along lecturing us about safety.

"Grid bolted (regularly spaced)" sport routes went out with the 1990's, LL. More contemporary bolting makes the routes (mostly) safe but not sterile.  Over time, people learn, evolve, and do better.  Amen.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 07:40:26 PM 
Started by lucky luke - Last post by lucky luke
That's a lot of words to basically say: "be mindful to protect the pitch so you don't hit a ledge or the ground if you fall".
Just saying...

It is a little bit more than that. An other strategy than sport, a strategy to be fast, is to not protect the easy ground and just protect over 5.9. Of course, for that, you most be a good 5.10 climber. For that reason, I don't suggest to imitate the strong climber. I went to the yosemite and I saw many climber going "by the book" and many can't do a 5.7 run out or some times, they can't even protect the pitch as an expert to do the run out safely (twenty foot run out for example).

In trad, if you look at where you are going to fall, you will understand that you are going to be scare, but if you like that ethic of climbing, you will see the danger and also the solution to be safe. Instead of climbing a 5.10 the first year, maybe you will be at 5.6 or .7, but you will learn strategy to be safe.

In sport, you will learn that you can do it. You will arrive in a cliff and you can do it. When you are going to understand that the nuts can not hold your fall, you are going to be scare. The emotional pattern that you learn is not adapt for trad ethic...

As much as trad ethic is not adapt to sport.

How can we learn to make good strategy can be general, but also specific to one route. Climbing the nose and regular north face of half dome is different strategy, but the average lenght and difficulty is not to different.     

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