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21
Epics and Accidents / Re: Accident 7/5/17
« Last post by xcrag_corex on July 14, 2017, 11:16:02 AM »
Glad to hear that you are expected to make a full recovery! Abbot told me about the accident. Heal up soon man!
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General Climbing / jockeys cap
« Last post by iclimb on July 14, 2017, 10:39:45 AM »
Hey everyone - did some forum searches and didn't find anything recent so thought I'd type up my question.

Anyone been to jockeys cap lately and know what shape the bolts, hangers, and rings are in?

Looking to go this weekend for some top rope and sport stuff and have never gone there.

Also, for the west face with top rope options, what is access to the rings for anchor building like up top? Is it sketchy getting to the rings on the slab top out to build the anchor, or is there a place higher up I can anchor into before building on the rings closer to the edge?

Tried looking online and obviously I'll see when I get there, just doing some research and passing the day from office blues.
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Epics and Accidents / Accident 7/5/17
« Last post by darthgator on July 14, 2017, 09:27:05 AM »
I was involved in a climbing accident in a remote location in Maine and my partner (Pokey) and I were able to self rescue, but in essence, my partner's skill and competence got me out of there.

Situation: We were new routing, trying to take the climb to the top.  We were on the 4th pitch which was new terrain for us both.  I climbed up some dirty, but featured face to get to a slabby ledge capped by another head wall with large spruce tree above that.  My partner and I discussed that the objective was for me to anchor at this tree to complete my pitch.  I was approximately 50' above my belayer and 15-20 above my last piece of gear (#3 camalot) with several pieces below that on the face, and about 20 feet left of last piece of gear (and belayer).  Despite understanding the runout, dirtiness, and fall potential, I opted to make the thin move (5.7-5.8ish) to a hand hold where I could subsequently tether a tree for protection.  Upon executing the move, the handhold crumbled/dislodged, resulting in me falling back and rotating counter-clockwise.

Experience: I remember falling and tumbling down the slabby ledge. I remember hitting a tree or tree scruff and being please by this as I was hopeful it would arrest my fall or at least slow me down.  Next, I remember the rap.  My partner commanding me to allow gravity to do its work as he controlled our rappel, in tandem.  We then walked out which was a slow going and painful process.  We loaded up and he drove me to health care.

I recall telling him that I thought I needed to go see a dentist as my teeth felt messed up.  My partner then declared that I was going to a hospital, not the dentist.  Initially I insisted that we go to Maine Medical Center in Portland, but eventually, with my partner's reasoning, we decided to call an ambulance and we caravaned to the nearest hospital after rendezvousing at gas station.

Injury: I sustained multiple facial injuries and a self diagnosed concussion.  Specifically, I fractured my lower jaw, cheek-bones, skull, nose, and two ribs.  I am a big advocate of wearing a helmet and am confident that it helped me, but upon subsequent inspection of my helmet, it looks unremarkable.  I am now one week out from the incident and for treatment, I have had my jaw wired shut and have pain medication.  I am told I will have my jaw wired shut for approximately for 4 weeks to let the bone set.  The good news is that I am now at sending weight as I have lost 15lbs since having my jaw wired shut.

Prevention:  This is a difficult part for me to examine, but one thing I could have done was drilled bolts for protection, but I did not want to alter the rock as I was not satisfied with the route and not confident it was 'the route.'  Ultimately, I was in a place where there was no protection or options for building an adequate anchor.  I could have retreated down and traversed back right to my last piece and built an anchor there, but I was not satisfied with that location or terminal for the pitch to end.  Moreover, I was having fun!

Lesson:  I am grateful that I was climbing with a competent, experienced, and skilled partner who was able to get us out of there as I did not have the cognition after falling to make reasonably safe decisions.  Always when new routing, climbing alpine, or in a situation where self rescue is required, climb with a partner who is competent in self rescue and has the means and knowledge to perform such a task in such area.

I am expected to make a full recovery and I believe I am already ahead of schedule.  I am thankful for my partner Pokey for getting be out alive, the support from family and friends, and the climbing community as a whole as everyone has been supportive.


Ben Smith
24
Epics and Accidents / Re: Barber wall, nutcracker; thank you to MRS and conway fd
« Last post by Jeff on July 13, 2017, 01:41:21 PM »
ralbert20:Thanks for a very cogent and helpful report; Wow, sounds like your partner was unlucky and at the same time lucky, as the consequences (although serious) could have been so much worse! Wishing him a swift and total recovery. Sounds like the key piece of protection ended up being his helmet ( in addition to his belayer of course)!! We are all thankful for the availability and willingness to respond of the MRS members. I'd like to make a pitch to all reading these reports to think about making a donation to the MRS on a regular basis-- they are there to help all of us, whether directly or by helping one of our partners or friends. It's easy to do when you stop in to IME on your visits to the Mount Washington Valley.
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General Climbing / Re: PSA - Hugo's Horror Revisited
« Last post by M_Sprague on July 12, 2017, 10:08:10 PM »
I don't know why those bolts were placed at an angle. the rock looks just fine straight across from either bolt.

I'm no expert on placing fixed anchors but I will say I prefer either level bolts placed 10-12 inches apart or vertically like the last anchor on Rapid Transit... that anchor is quite unique isn't it?

In good, solid rock, for horizontal placements, you really don't need to go so far apart.  It just makes it so you need giant chains to lesson the vector and not twist your rope so badly. I usually spread my pinky and thumb on my hand as far as I can and use that as the distance. Unless it is for rock quality, angled bolt placements don't make a lot of sense to me (unless they are almost vertical and you are giving a little room for the hardware) 

Though I have usually been partial to horizontal placements, vertical anchor placements have some benefits in certain situations. I go with horizontal since I like the way you can slap 2 quickdraws on if you  need to set up a TR and  you have slightly more wiggle room at the anchor.
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WOW! hope for a speedy and full recovery!
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General Climbing / Re: PSA - Hugo's Horror Revisited
« Last post by tradmanclimbz on July 12, 2017, 09:21:11 PM »
RTFM  proveideing the rock is good the  actual specs for most wedge bolts  call for them to be placed 10X the diamater of the hole apart or about 3" for a 3/8th inch hole. I like to go about 6 in apart in good solid stone. farther apart twists the  hangers and the rope.
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General Climbing / Re: PSA - Hugo's Horror Revisited
« Last post by Admin Al on July 12, 2017, 09:16:19 PM »
that anchor is quite unique isn't it?

I'm sure there is a story...
29
Climbing Gear Q & A / Petzl 2017 Sirocco Review
« Last post by NEAlpineStart on July 12, 2017, 08:32:53 PM »
Interested in the update to the Sirocco? I go into it in quite a bit of detail here:

https://northeastalpinestart.com/2017/07/12/gear-review-petzl-2017-sirocco-climbing-helmet/

TL:DR it is a nice improvement over a design I already liked.
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I made the 911 call. I was belaying.
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