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 21 
 on: Yesterday at 07:24:42 AM 
Started by strandman - Last post by Admin Al
If you have arthritis, like I do in my left thumb, it's all about ice. Inflammation is definitely NOT needed or desired for that.

 22 
 on: July 22, 2014, 11:06:01 PM 
Started by M_Sprague - Last post by sneoh
Wow, that is a nice looking route if I may say so.

 23 
 on: July 22, 2014, 10:48:58 PM 
Started by strandman - Last post by ELM
Ice has it's place in pain control Mark. It has drawbacks but not as many as
Narcotics have. Ice has to be used correctly though...too much can lead to big issues.

 24 
 on: July 22, 2014, 09:54:53 PM 
Started by strandman - Last post by strandman
I'm way past turmeric at this stage.......i think inflammation/arthritis is still an issue for icing..we'll see

 25 
 on: July 22, 2014, 09:19:22 PM 
Started by strandman - Last post by Pete Jackson
Turmeric.   Big anti-inflammatry properties.  I messed my shoulder up on Right Banana Crack in J Tree in the 80's, re-wrecked the same last summer clubbing a porcupine.  It was not getting better until I hit the turmeric hard last fall.  I'm doing skin-the cats now at the playground while Ella is swinging.   Looking to keep all original parts.

You clubbed a porcupine? I think we need to hear that story!

 26 
 on: July 22, 2014, 09:15:56 PM 
Started by steve4464 - Last post by Pete Jackson
Putting a locking biner on the draw instead of a standard wire gate is addressing a completely different hazard than turning a wire gate upside down, unless you're placing opposite and opposed wire gates the inverted biner, again my opinion, gives you nothing... other than perhaps the same warm-comfy feeling that a double fisherman above your figure eight provides...

Lockers on both sides of the draw, not just the rope side.

Alternatively, an alpine draw that twists freely is less likely to suffer the hanger side unclipping than a sewn dogbone.   

 27 
 on: July 22, 2014, 08:42:04 PM 
Started by strandman - Last post by eyebolter
Turmeric.   Big anti-inflammatry properties.  I messed my shoulder up on Right Banana Crack in J Tree in the 80's, re-wrecked the same last summer clubbing a porcupine.  It was not getting better until I hit the turmeric hard last fall.  I'm doing skin-the cats now at the playground while Ella is swinging.   Looking to keep all original parts.

 28 
 on: July 22, 2014, 07:27:48 PM 
Started by strandman - Last post by M_Sprague
Inflammation is part of the healing process. The ice makes you feel better because it numbs you out.

http://www.caringmedical.com/sports-injuries/rice-why-we-do-not-recommend-it/

Just one article quickly picked out from a search, but there are tons more you can find.

"What about inflammation? Should it be reduced with ice?
Inflammation is necessary because it plays an important role in the healing and recovery of muscle cells and soft tissue regeneration. Tissue that is damaged through trauma or vigorous exercise requires inflammation. When muscles and other tissues are damaged, your body sends inflammatory cells to the damaged tissue to promote healing. Inflammatory cells rush to injured tissue to start the healing. “During the early period of inflammation, damaged muscle cells are eliminated by phagocytosis of macrophages.” The macrophages release a hormone called insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) into the damaged tissues, which helps muscles and other injured parts to heal. Mirkin states, “Applying ice to reduce swelling actually delays healing by preventing the body from releasing IGF-1.”1 Muscle cell regeneration takes place by recruiting stem cells from surrounding tissues. This early response can last for a week along with the elevated circulating levels of CK-MB and myoglobin during the regeneration phase. Thus any change in these rates, as occurs with ice application, would be expected to affect the timing of muscle regeneration. Tseng et al conclude, “The result of greater increases in exercise-induced CK-MB and myoglobin levels between 48 and 72 h post-exercise and peak shift in inflammatory cytokine IL-12p70 may reflect a change in the time course of cell turnover and muscle regeneration by topical cooling. As it stands, our results provide evidence that topical cooling does not enhance and appears to delay the return to normal of muscle damage markers and subjective fatigue feeling after eccentric exercise. The surge in tissue oxygenation after removal of the cooling application may be part of the mechanisms involved in the delayed recovery. Collectively, these results indicate that intervention with topical cooling disrupts the normal adaptive responses to exercise.”

 29 
 on: July 22, 2014, 07:10:01 PM 
Started by strandman - Last post by strandman
thanks..the 2 hips are great..I look foward to PT....cause that's the way i am
  You sicko.. :D
  Insist on an ice therapy machine to take home with you. Those puppies have really made doing PT and using a CPM much more tolerable for people. Remember though: take it off after 30 minutes no matter how good it feels!


A relative just used one for his shoulder surgery andloved it.....do they get really cold ? I like COLD

Ice doesn't help healing,but it sure reduces swelling and inflammation.i am still on the fence about this one

 30 
 on: July 22, 2014, 07:09:17 PM 
Started by M_Sprague - Last post by M_Sprague
Here is one Amy sent me that I forgot I snapped with her camera when she got to the top. Not a great shot, but it gives a sense of the route.


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